Hanna Rosin

With Alix Spiegel and Lulu Miller, Hanna Rosin co-hosts Invisibilia, a show from NPR about the unseen forces that control human behavior—our ideas, beliefs, assumptions, and thoughts. Invisibilia interweaves personal stories with fascinating psychological and brain science, in a way that ultimately makes you see your own life differently. Excerpts of the show are featured on the NPR News programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. The program is also available as a podcast.

Rosin comes to NPR from the world of print magazines. Most recently she was a national correspondent for The Atlantic, where she wrote cover stories about various corners of American culture. Her favorite stories are dark but reveal something humane about the way we live now, "The Craigslist Murders," "The Overprotected Kid," and "The Suicides in Silicon Valley." She is a longtime writer for Slate and host of the DoubleX Gabfest. She has been on the Daily Show and the Colbert Show when they were both shows and so fun to be on. Rosin has headlined a TED conference and was part of a team at New York Magazine that won a National Magazine Award for a series of stories on circumcision. She is also the author of two books, including the End of Men. She likes men, though, and she really likes learning radio from her fellow Invisibilia hosts.

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DON GONYEA, HOST:

One day in 2012, a group of policemen in a Danish town were sitting around in the office when an unusual call came in. This town, called Aarhus, is a clean, orderly place with very little crime. So what the callers were saying really held the cops' attention. They were parents, and they were "just hysterical," recalled Thorleif Link, one of the officers. Their son was missing. They woke up one day and he was gone.

A few weeks ago at a soccer game I was coaching, my team got trounced. They are 7 and they are not used to losing. As soon as I called the game and they realized what had just happened, two of the boys burst out crying.