Don Noble

Program Host: Book Reviews

Dr. Noble is the host of APR's book review series as well as host of BOOKMARK which airs on Alabama Public Television.  A widely published scholar specializing in American and Southern literature, Dr. Noble received the Eugene Current-Garcia Award as Alabama's distinguished literary scholar for the year 2000 and was nominated for a Regional Emmy Award in 2006 and 2011.  In addition he is on the planning committee of several literary conferences.

Dr. Noble's book reviews air during Morning Edition and feature works primarily by Alabama writers.  His reviews focus on why these writers are concerned with their particular subjects and how they succeed or fail  in addressing issues of concern to Alabama readers.

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Books
2:37 pm
Mon March 15, 2010

"The Road from Chapel Hill" and "Child of the South" by Joanna Catherine Scott

Joanna Catherine Scott would seem an unlikely person to write Civil War books set in the old South. She was born in London in 1943 during an air raid and raised in Australia. In Perth, Western Australia, Scott met a visiting PhD student from Duke and returned with him to North Carolina. She has written a shelf of books, poetry, fiction and nonfiction, but this pair of novels is her first work set around the Civil War.

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Books
4:24 pm
Mon March 8, 2010

"Eli the Good" by Silas House

Even in such excellent company, Silas House's career has been something of a phenomenon. His first novel, "Clay's Quilt," came out in 2001, and his second and third, "A Parchment of Leaves" (2002) and "The Coal Tattoo"( 2004 ) both won Kentucky Novel of the Year awards. House has also won the Special Achievement Award from the fellowship of Southern Writers and Appalachian Book of the Year, and "Eli The Good" is his fourth novel in just nine years. (He has also written two plays. and two movies. No writer's block here.)

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Books
10:34 am
Mon March 1, 2010

"Enchanted Evening Barbie and the Second Coming: A Memoir" by Rheta Grimsley Johnson

Even as a child in Montgomery, this future reporter was already a skeptic. At an early age she had doubts about Santa Claus, even though she wanted a Barbie doll in the worst way, and before long these doubts spread to most conventional metaphysics, although as a citizen of the South, she has tended to keep her "doubts" to herself.

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Books
11:26 am
Mon February 22, 2010

"The Confederate General Rides North" by Amanda C. Gable

Amanda C. Gable is a native of Marietta, Georgia, and after a number of years of higher education and university teaching and administration has turned her hand to fiction. "The Confederate General Rides North" is her first novel. The year of this story is 1968, and it matters. That spring, as many of us remember, was the season of the assassinations of Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., both occurring, it seemed, very soon after the assassination of JFK in November of 1963.

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Books
1:30 pm
Mon February 15, 2010

"Bound South" by Susan Rebecca White

This novel has that most valuable of assets, a great first chapter. It is fall, 1998, in Atlanta. Louise Parker, 47, is going to pick up her mother-in-law, Nanny Rose, to drive her to their maid's funeral. Sandy was 65, an African-American, and a perfect servant for 33 years.

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Books
1:34 pm
Mon February 8, 2010

"The Big Steal" by Emyl Jenkins

Emyl Jenkins of Virginia and North Carolina had achieved, by the 1980's, a national reputation as an expert in antiques. She has been the author of two syndicated antiques columns, "Antique Wise" and "Ask an Appraiser" and is the author of "Emyl Jenkins' Appraisal Book: Identifying, Understanding and Valuing Your Treasures" (1989).

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Books
3:27 pm
Mon February 1, 2010

"In the Sanctuary of Outcasts" by Neil White

Neil White had it made. A good-looking fellow, the son and grandson of lawyers, White had graduated from Ole Miss after four years as a self-satisfied Kappa Sigma, married a beautiful girl, Linda, and was the father of two adorable children, Neil and Maggie. The family lived in Oxford, Mississippi, where Neil was the founding publisher of the "other" newspaper, the "Oxford Times."

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Books
2:31 pm
Mon January 25, 2010

"Broken Wing" by Thomas Lakeman

Within a few pages, though, the reader realizes everybody's personal life is to go on hold as Yeager is recruited to go undercover to New Orleans, to rescue a young woman kept hostage and break up a particularly vicious organized crime ring. He will go as a "broken wing," an agent disgraced and drummed out of the Bureau and, now "rogue," willing to join the bad guys and seek revenge for his terrible disgrace.

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Books
10:43 am
Tue January 19, 2010

In and Out of Madness: a fictionalized account of a true experience

This book comes heavily blurbed, including one by a psychiatrist, and the blurbs all say essentially the same thing: "In and Out of Madness" is powerful, raw, brutal and honest. I guess it is all those things. It was not for me, however, a satisfying piece of fiction.

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Books
3:30 pm
Mon December 7, 2009

"Masques for the Fields of Time" by Joe Taylor

Joe Taylor, Professor of English at the University of West Alabama, is the author of a novel, "Oldcat and Ms. Puss: A Book of Days for You and Me," and two volumes of stories, "The World's Thinnest Fat Man" and "Some Heroes, Some Heroines, Some Others."

Joe Taylor, Professor of English at the University of West Alabama, is the author of a novel, "Oldcat and Ms. Puss: A Book of Days for You and Me," and two volumes of stories, "The World's Thinnest Fat Man" and "Some Heroes, Some Heroines, Some Others."

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Books
2:57 pm
Mon November 30, 2009

"Twelve and Counting: The National Championships of Alabama Football" edited by Kenneth Gaddy

As the Alabama football team moves to the end of a so-far undefeated season and hopes are very high for a national championship, this seems like a perfectly reasonable time to take a look at "Twelve and Counting."

As the Alabama football team moves to the end of a so-far undefeated season and hopes are very high for a national championship, this seems like a perfectly reasonable time to take a look at "Twelve and Counting."

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Books
12:05 pm
Mon November 23, 2009

"Undeniable Truths" by A. M. Garner

A.M. Garner, who has been teaching for some time in Florence, at the University of North Alabama, and before that at Virginia Commonwealth University, holds the MFA degree in fiction writing from The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.

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Books
9:43 am
Mon November 16, 2009

"Dixie Noir" by Kirk Curnutt

Curnutt is a good-natured man but not a comic writer. I had hoped, and for a few pages felt, that "Dixie Noir" was something lighter. It seemed at first as if Curnutt were having some fun with noir, that this novel might be a send-up of the noir genre, something like what Garrison Keeler does in Guy Noir, Private Eye, but this turned out definitely not to be the case.

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Books
12:50 pm
Mon November 9, 2009

"The Most They Ever Had" by Rick Bragg

Many of these stories are sad stories. The reader is more likely to weep than smile, but they will affect you.

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Books
10:49 am
Mon November 2, 2009

"Black Maverick: T.R.M. Howard's Fight for Civil Rights and Economic Power"

Some mark the start of the modern Civil Rights Movement with the Montgomery bus boycott. Some, closer to correct, mark it at the murder of Emmett Till. But no mass movement starts big, all of a sudden.

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