Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship blog. In the past, he has coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, and edited the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Pages

The Two-Way
10:28 am
Mon June 15, 2015

Magna Carta, 'This Awful Thing' That Shaped Legal Rights, Turns 800

The London copy of the 1215 Magna Carta, on display by the British Library. The document was sealed on June 15, 1215.
2289 The British Library

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 11:18 am

The Great Charter is now an octocentenarian. The document that laid a legal cornerstone for thousands of judicial systems was sealed on June 15, 1215. It was nullified within weeks — but the horse of due process was already out of the barn of royal privilege.

The landmark birthday prompted an animated Google Doodle on the search engine's British site, featuring King John with a group of barons. It also depicts a man wearing a ball and chain, a reference to the rights that eventually reached beyond the nobility.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:18 pm
Fri June 12, 2015

Federal Employee Breach Very Likely Included Security Clearance Info

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 11:58 am

Along with the massive security breach that exposed millions of federal workers' personnel records, a possible separate intrusion may have exposed information from background checks that were done on both federal employees and applicants.

That's part of an update from a senior Obama administration official who declined to be named on the record because of the ongoing investigation into the cyberattack against the Office of Personnel Management.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:20 pm
Fri June 12, 2015

N.Y. Prison Worker Joyce Mitchell Arrested Over Killers' Escape

Joyce Mitchell is arraigned in City Court on Friday in Plattsburgh, N.Y. Mitchel is accused of helping two convicted killers escape from Clinton Correctional Facility, where she is an employee.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 3:21 am

New York State Police say they've arrested Clinton Correctional Facility worker Joyce Mitchell and charged her with "providing material assistance" to two convicted killers who escaped from the prison last weekend.

Update at 11:15 p.m. ET

Read more
The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Fri June 12, 2015

#Distractinglysexy Tweets Are Female Scientists' Retort To 'Disappointing' Comments

Madison Herbert was among the female scientists who tweeted messages mocking the views of Nobel laureate Tim Hunt, who recently spoke out against women in labs.
Twitter

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 10:03 pm

A Nobel-winning biochemist's announcement that he has "trouble with girls" in labs because they either cause romantic sparks or start crying when criticized ignited wide condemnation. And as a barrage of tweets shows, the responses of many female scientists are neither silent nor unfunny.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:06 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

Wrestler Dusty Rhodes, The American Dream, Has Died

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 4:37 pm

Dusty Rhodes, the passionately outspoken wrestler whose career spanned decades, has died at age 69, according to the WWE. Nicknamed The American Dream, Dusty Rhodes was the stage name of Virgil Runnels. He died in Marietta, Ga., an area northwest of Atlanta.

Playing a variety of roles and competing in hundreds of arenas during his wrestling career, Rhodes was often a stand-in for the common man, a fierce fighter who pitted his bulldog physique against more chiseled rivals such as Ric Flair. His victories often came after absorbing a staggering array of injuries.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:31 am
Thu June 11, 2015

Joyce Carol Oates On Dinosaur-Killer Tweet: 'My Tweets Are Meant To Be Funny'

Author Joyce Carol Oates, seen here at a a panel discussion last October, sparked jokes, and then a debate, by tweeting about the "barbaric" killing of a triceratops.
Thos Robinson Getty Images for The New Yorker

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 3:23 pm

After Joyce Carol Oates sent an outraged tweet about the "barbaric" killing of an animal this week, a debate emerged: Was the author, 77, slipping? The question was prompted by the image accompanying Oates' tweet, of a triceratops and a smiling Steven Spielberg.

"So barbaric that this should still be allowed," Oates wrote. "No conservation laws in effect wherever this is?"

Read more
The Two-Way
3:52 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

'Some Indication' That N.Y. Escapees Might Have Headed To Vermont

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 4:10 pm

"There is some indication" that two convicted killers who escaped from a maximum security prison in New York "might have planned to head to Vermont" after escaping, Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin says.

He spoke at a news conference held near the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, N.Y., where inmates David Sweat and Richard Matt escaped this past weekend.

Shumlin said the authorities have information suggesting the two men might have considered New York "too hot" and that they might instead head to a camp in Vermont.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

'His Emotions Got The Best Of Him' At Pool, Officer's Attorney Says

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 6:44 pm

An attorney representing former McKinney, Texas, police Cpl. Eric Casebolt says the officer was not targeting minorities and was in an emotional state even before he responded to a call about a disturbance at a pool party.

"His first call was a suicide at an apartment complex," said attorney Jane Bishkin, who is representing Casebolt on behalf of the Fraternal Order of Police. Casebolt resigned Tuesday.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:10 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

Nobel Laureate In Hot Water For 'Trouble With Girls' In Labs

Biochemist Tim Hunt, a 2001 Nobel laureate, has apologized – to an extent – for saying that women are a disruptive presence in scientific labs. He's seen here in 2012.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 3:29 pm

In 2001, Tim Hunt won a share of a Nobel Prize. In 2006, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. But in 2015, he's being widely criticized for his recent remarks about women in science, including: "when you criticize them, they cry."

Hunt, a biochemist, made that and other comments during a speech this week at the World Conference of Science Journalists that's being held in South Korea this week. He was quoted in a tweet that's since been shared hundreds of times, asking the audience to "let me tell you about my trouble with girls."

Read more
The Two-Way
11:35 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Cleveland Officials: Police Are Being Retrained On Interacting With The Public

"This is a defining moment for Cleveland," Mayor Frank Jackson says of reform efforts. He's seen here at a news conference last month.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 12:22 pm

More than seven months after a Justice Department report on the Cleveland Police Department cited a "pattern of unconstitutional policing and excessive force," city officials say officers are getting new training on both interacting with youths and the use of force.

The federal report was spurred by a string of claims that Cleveland's police used excessive force. It came out last December — one month after police shot and killed 12-year-old Tamir Rice at a public park. Rice had been playing with a pellet gun.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:50 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Vatican Establishes Tribunal To Investigate Bishops In Abuse Cases

Pope Francis approved a plan Wednesday to set up a tribunal to review charges of negligence against bishops who are accused of covering up cases of sexual abuse by priests.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

Taking a new step toward holding bishops accountable for not protecting children who were sexually abused by priests, Pope Francis has set up a tribunal that will hear cases against senior clergy. But a victims' group says the Vatican isn't going far enough.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:52 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Abortion Restriction Law Is Backed By Federal Court In Texas

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 2:50 pm

A federal appeals court has upheld sweeping abortion restrictions in Texas, in the latest swing in a back-and-forth battle in the state. The court has backed key parts of a controversial 2013 law that critics say would put some clinics at risk of closing.

The ruling by the 5th Circuit Appeals Court could prompt the plaintiffs — several women's health clinics, a doctor, and their patients — to file an appeal with the Supreme Court.

NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Chief Calls Actions Of Officer From McKinney, Texas, Pool Party Video 'Indefensible'

Hundreds of protesters rally in McKinney, Texas, on Monday. Officers' response to a pool party has sparked a debate over racism and the proper use of force.
Mike Stone Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 7:16 pm

Updated at 6:51 p.m. ET:

Cpl. Eric Casebolt has resigned from the McKinney, Texas, police department, following actions responding to a party on Friday that police Chief Greg Conley described as "out of control" and "indefensible," the Dallas Morning News reports.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:16 am
Tue June 9, 2015

Virginia Court Is Ordered To Reconsider Injunction In Sweet Briar College Case

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 12:41 pm

Giving at least a temporary victory to opponents of the plan to close Sweet Briar College, the Virginia Supreme Court has ordered a lower court to review its rejection of a request for a temporary injunction that would freeze the process of closing the school.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:30 am
Tue June 9, 2015

Vincent Bugliosi, Manson Prosecutor And 'Helter Skelter' Author, Dies

Writer and former prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi, seen here in 2011, has died at age 80.
David Livingston Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 9:49 am

Former Los Angeles prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi, who pivoted from the courtroom to writing, has died at age 80. After the 1969 murder of actress Sharon Tate and six others thrust Bugliosi into the spotlight, he won convictions against Charles Manson and several of his followers.

Bugliosi's son tells The Associated Press that the former district attorney died Saturday in Los Angeles after a fight with cancer.

Read more

Pages