Alex AuBuchon

News Host / Reporter

Alex AuBuchon is APR’s Morning Edition host and also writes news and feature stories. He got his start in nonprofit radio at the University of Tennessee’s venerable WUTK-FM.

AuBuchon started as a student DJ before quickly falling in with the news team. He spent a semester on the news staff and then a year as News Director, delivering live newscasts and teaching broadcast workshops to undergraduate journalism students.

AuBuchon then switched over to commercial radio, taking a job as Operations Manager and Assistant News Director for a group of four radio stations in his hometown of Paris, Tennessee. He scheduled traffic and automation breaks and did administrative work for four stations during the week, and delivered newscasts and maintained a popular news website on the weekends.

Alex crossed back over to public radio in January 2015, moving to Alabama to wake up early and give listeners the news they need to get ready for the day.

Martin Jay Creasman
Alabama Department of Corrections

A 51 year old escapee from a Morgan County prison has been arrested on accusations that he stole a pickup truck and crashed it into two women, killing them both.

Birmingham police allege Martin Jay Creasman stole a pickup truck from a Birmingham auto shop, then crashed into a car containing 92 year old Margie Lovell and 69 year old Linda Jones. The two women were on their way to a church meeting. The Avondale United Methodist Church released a statement on Twitter saying Lovell and Jones were "well-loved" and "pillars of [their] congregation".

Another Alabama death row inmate is petitioning courts to order his release.

Donnis George Musgrove has been on death row for 27 years since being convicted of capital murder in February 1988. His request for release comes after two other men once on Alabama's death row are now enjoying freedom.

Blue Bell Creameries announced Thursday it will be closing all its facilities including a plant in Sylacauga, Alabama for cleaning and retraining in response to a listeria outbreak linked to Blue Bell ice cream.

The company says the program comes after a thorough review of all its internal operations and discussions with expert microbiologists.

Alabama’s Senate could be debating allowing medical marijuana in the state soon, since a Senate committee approved a comprehensive medical marijuana bill yesterday.

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 4 to 3 to pass the measure. The bill was likely able to pass committee because three Republican senators failed to attend the meeting.

The legislation, if passed, would allow patients who suffer from 25 specific conditions to purchase a maximum of ten ounces of medical marijuana per month from a state-regulated dispensary.

Michelle Obama
Ben Baker / Redux

Gov. Robert Bentley is giving lawmakers what he calls an "unvarnished" view of the cuts to state government that will occur without new revenue.

The governor sent a memo to each member of the Alabama Legislature last night. That memo describes the emergency operation plans state agencies produced in response to a draft budget lawmakers have already reviewed.

The reductions on the table include the layoff of more than 1,000 state employees, including 600 court employees and 132 law enforcement officers.

Governor Robert Bentley says the state faces a “real crisis” with its budget. Bentley is now taking his fight to fill the state’s coffers to the streets.

The governor is continuing his tour of speaking engagements to rally support for his proposed $541 million tax proposal. He spoke at Guntersville State Park yesterday.

Selma-based Hyundai supplier Lear Corporation is disputing allegations that it fired a whistleblower in a federal safety investigation.

Lear said on Friday that allegations of employees being exposed to the hazardous chemical TDI are false. The company says the air in the plant has been tested by multiple independent parties.

However, NBC recently reported that a Yale University medical clinic tested blood samples from nearly twenty workers, and five showed exposure to the chemical.

Despite a dire budget situation that may force two thirds of Alabama's state parks to close, two of the parks remaining open are planning to build new hotels on site.

Both Gulf State Park in Gulf Shores and Oak Mountain State Park south of Birmingham are finalizing major upgrade plans to their facilities, which include multi million dollar hotels.

St. Clair Prison
Equal Justice Initiative

15 inmates received medical treatment after a riot at St. Clair Correctional Facility Friday afternoon.

A correctional officer was assaulted during the prison's morning meal Friday. After the attack, the Alabama Department of Corrections' Correctional Emergency Response Team was sent to the prison. All inmates were ordered to return to their cells, but the occupants of one cell block refused.

Forecasters say severe weather is possible this weekend for much of Alabama.

Parts of southwestern Alabama have already seen over a foot of rain this week, and the National Weather Service says even more rainfall is expected both today and tomorrow.

The NWS says severe storms will likely develop over central and southern Alabama this evening with wind gusts approaching 60 mph. Conditions may be even worse tomorrow night, with the possibility of isolated tornadoes, 70 mph winds and potential golf ball sized hail.

April 20 marks the fifth anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the largest marine oil spill in history.

The catastrophic event left 11 workers dead and ultimately spilled over 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Margaret Brown’s latest documentary The Great Invisible chronicles both the spill and its aftermath, following both oil executives and the affected residents of the Gulf Coast.

A federal judge has issued a temporary restraining order against a company accused of retaliating against whistleblowing workers in Selma.

Workers in a Selma automotive parts plant have complained about conditions in the plant and were involved in a federal investigation.

An order filed by the U.S. Department of Labor Wednesday in U.S. District Court Wednesday blocks the Lear Corporation and Renosol Seating from terminating, suspending, suing, threatening or retaliating against current or former employees.

A Senate committee has approved a bill that would repeal Common Core standards in Alabama public schools.

The State Senate Committee on Education and Youth Affairs voted 5-3 yesterday morning in favor of repealing current standards applying to math and English curriculums.

Those standards are built into the state's Alabama College and Career Ready Standards.

Supporters of the bill say repealing Common Core gives more control to state and local educators.

Opponents say it would put Alabama behind other states and disrupt learning.

The singer who became famous for the song "When a Man Loves a Woman" died yesterday. Percy Sledge had a massive impact on what became known as the "Muscle Shoals sound".

Sledge walked into a recording studio in Alabama's Muscle Shoals region in 1966. In a few weeks, his signature song "When a Man Loves a Woman" would become the first of his five gold records.

Dick Cooper is the Curator of the Alabama Music Hall of Fame. He says Sledge's legacy was defined when he was just 25 years old.

Baldwin County school officials plan to meet today to talk about the failure of a tax plan at the ballot box. That meeting will focus on what to do now.

The referendum was voted down March 31. It would have given the county an 8 mill property tax increase. Voters in Baldwin County also voted to end existing funding that gives Baldwin County 12 mills a year. Now, Baldwin County only has 8 mills total in education tax revenue, and needs to get to the state-mandated 10 mills.

Democrats in Alabama’s House of Representatives say it’s time for the state to consider legalized gambling as an additional source of revenue.

House Democrats revealed their legislative agenda yesterday. It includes creating a state lottery and urging Gov. Bentley to negotiate a compact with the Poarch Band of Creek Indians. The tribe would be allowed to operate table games without interference in exchange for giving the state a share of the revenue.

House Minority Leader Craig Ford said Alabama’s voters deserve the chance to vote on a state lottery.

National Weather Service forecasters say thunderstorms this evening and tomorrow morning could bring large hail and heavy winds to parts of Alabama, and may spawn small tornadoes.

The latest forecasts and models from the NWS show that the highest potential for severe weather in the state will be in the northwest corner of Alabama, in and around the Florence area.

Forecasters say these storms hold the potential for what they describe as "brief, spin-up" tornadoes.

Committee members throughout the Alabama Legislature have a busy day ahead of them.

The Senate Education Committee will hold a public hearing this morning on a bill aiming to repeal the Common Core curriculum standards.

The House Ways and Means Education Committee will also consider changes to the Alabama Accountability Act, a state program that provides scholarships to help some families pay for private school.

Lawmakers in Alabama may ban the majority of abortions in the state if a bill currently in the House of Representatives is approved.

Rep. Terri Collins (R) of Decatur has proposed legislation to ban abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

Collins says that if the end of life is defined by the absence of a heartbeat, it makes sense to her to define the beginning of life with the start of a heartbeat.

Two Alabama economic development bills aimed at bringing new jobs to the state are another step closer to becoming law.

Alabama lawmakers passed legislation yesterday to revamp how the state offers economic incentives to companies.

The Alabama Jobs Act would create a pay-as-you-go model for tax abatements and other benefits offered to companies creating jobs or capital investment in the state. Alabama's present model offers those incentives upfront.

That bill is now headed to Governor Bentley's desk to be signed into law.

The voting is over regarding charter schools in Alabama. Now, the big question is how to implement these non-traditional schools and what happens next.

Governor Robert Bentley put Alabama in line with 42 other states by signing SB45 into law last month, allowing charter schools to operate. Perhaps the most asked question about these non-traditional schools is what exactly the difference is between them and a regular public school.

The Alabama Senate will start debating some sweeping changes to the state's prison system today.

Republican Senator Cam Ward is bringing the bill to the Senate floor, which would change sentencing and probation standards to try and reduce prison overcrowding.

The proposed legislation is based on a year of study by the state prison reform task force. One of the main changes is the creation of a new Class D felony level, which will keep low-level, non-violent offenders out of prison entirely.

Yesterday was a busy day in the Alabama Senate. Two bills passed the Senate floor and are on their way to be heard in the House of Representatives.

The first is a bill that looks to change how Alabama recruits businesses and industry. The Alabama Jobs Act would create a pay-as-you-go model for incentives like tax breaks that the state uses to recruit companies.

Under the old model, the state would provide millions of dollars of funding up-front. This bill will allow Alabama to peg those incentives to the companies' performance.

Henry Mabry has officially stepped down as the head of the Alabama Education Association.

His resignation comes after the AEA board voted back in February to terminate Mabry after an audit raised concerns about his financial management of the organization.

Mabry replaced longtime AEA head Paul Hubbert in 2011. It was Hubbert who built the education organization into a massive political powerhouse. Hubbert expressed some grave concerns about the AEA's fiscal health before he passed away last year.

The Jefferson County School Board recently announced sweeping cuts for the school system, which will include substantial layoffs.

The Board plans to cut $12.6 million from the system budget and to eliminate 162 positions. Other staff members will see their contracts shortened.

Superintendent Dr. Craig Pouncey says the system's budget had been running at a deficit of around $10 million a year. By that rate, he says, the county could have been in danger of not making payroll within 3 or 4 years.

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley and Georgia Governor Nathan Deal met recently to discuss a long-running dispute over water.

The U.S. Supreme Court is preparing to hear a case out of Florida that seeks to limit Georgia's water withdrawals from the Chattahoochee River. Alabama officials are also concerned about Georgia's water use. Residents and officials in both Alabama and Florida argue that Georgia withdraws too much of the river upstream, which impacts wildlife and industry downstream.

The Jefferson County School Board recently announced sweeping cuts for the school system, which will include substantial layoffs.

The Board plans to cut $12.6 million from the system budget and to eliminate 162 positions. Other staff members will see their contracts shortened.

Superintendent Dr. Craig Pouncey says the system's budget had been running at a deficit of around $10 million a year. By that rate, he says, the county could have been in danger of not making payroll within 3 or 4 years.

Federal grant money will be awarded to help former employees of Decatur's International Paper find new jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor will be awarding nearly $825,000 in National Emergency Grant funding to help in the job search. A news release from the agency said the money would be used to "boost assistance at Alabama Career Center offices in Sheffield and Decatur to help the former mill employees secure new jobs".

International Paper employed 1,100 workers in the Decatur area. The plant closed earlier this year.

President Obama brought his Middle Class Economics plan to Lawson State Community College in Birmingham.

The Commander-in-Chief covered everything from Washington policy to a fairly new government agency called the Consumer Financial Protections Bureau. The CFPB was created as part of Wall Street reform after the 2008 financial crisis. It's an independent consumer watchdog, and President Obama says they've already made a big impact.

President Obama visited Alabama to talk about economics. The Commander-in-Chief arrived in Birmingham aboard Air Force One for a speech at Lawson State Community College. The President told the crowd what’s good for the middle class is good for America. The White House is criticizing a budget plan submitted by House Republicans which includes tax breaks for the wealthy.

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