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The Two-Way
11:17 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Judge Smooths Path For American-US Airways Merger

Cleared for takeoff: That's the message from the "new" American Airlines, after a bankruptcy judge ruled it could finalize its merger with US Airways Wednesday.
Brandon Wade AP

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 12:22 pm

A U.S. judge says American Airlines can exit bankruptcy and join forces with US Airways Group, all but ensuring that their merger can take place within weeks. Wednesday's bankruptcy court ruling was one of the final hurdles for a huge merger that's been in the works for more than a year.

The ruling by Judge Sean Lane comes months after he gave his preliminary approval to the plan. The two companies are now planning to finalize their merger on Dec. 9, when they would combine to create the world's largest airline.

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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Italian Senate Strips Berlusconi Of His Seat

Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi gestures during a speech to supporters Wednesday in Rome.
Tony Gentile Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 12:22 pm

Update at 12:25 p.m. ET. Berlusconi Expelled:

"Vote is done. Berlusconi is no longer senator," Reuters reported just before noon ET on its live blog.

So, former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, who as we said earlier has survived many other threats to his political life, now faces perhaps his most serious challenge.

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The Salt
10:55 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Tell Us About Your Family's Endangered Dishes

iStock

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 6:13 pm

If you tuned in to Wednesday's Morning Edition, you may have heard NPR host/special correspondent Michele Norris' conversation with Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil of Sacramento, Calif., in the latest story from The Race Card Project.

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Technology
10:39 am
Wed November 27, 2013

A Day In The Life: Blacks At The Cutting Edge Of Innovation

NPR Staff

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 12:17 pm

NPR's Tell Me More is again using social media to reach out to a new community of leaders — this time, to recognize black innovators in technology. African-Americans represent just 5 percent of America's scientists and engineers, according to a 2010 study by the National Science Foundation.

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Middle East
10:28 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Iranian Expats: Iranian State 'Not A Monolith'

The United States, along with five other world powers, has signed an agreement with Iran over its controversial nuclear program. What do Iranian expatriates in America think of the deal, which would temporarily ease western sanctions? Host Michel Martin speaks to human rights activist Sussan Tahmasebi and writer Roya Hakakian.

Monkey See
10:16 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Why Are Bruce Springsteen's Album Covers So ... Ugly?

Bruce Springsteen's High Hopes album cover fits a disturbing trend.

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 1:19 pm

On Monday morning, national treasure Bruce Springsteen announced that he'll release a new studio album two weeks into the new year. For dedicated fans like me, the announcement was full of curious details to pick over and discuss: Three songs, including the the title track, "High Hopes," were not written by Springsteen. Tom Morello, who's been playing with him on tour and whom The Boss calls "my muse" in the announcement, plays guitar on eight.

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The Protojournalist
10:13 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Project Xpat: A Seoul Food Holiday

Jessica Osborne, in green sweater, celebrates Thanksgiving with friends in Seoul.
Haley Wan

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 12:31 pm

For many Americans, Thanksgiving is more about people than pumpkin pie.

And for many Americans observing the special day in other countries — since pumpkin pie can be hard to come by — the people around them play a more prominent role.

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It's All Politics
10:09 am
Wed November 27, 2013

How Republicans And Democrats Ended Up Living Apart

New research suggests that increasing numbers of people want to live among those who share their politics. In this April 2010 photo, an aerial view of a Tucson, Ariz., housing development.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 2:27 pm

These are politically segregated times.

Secession movements are active in several states, generally consisting of residents of rural red counties seeking to separate themselves from the more liberal and urban-centered policies of blue-state leaders.

And Democrats and Republicans are much less likely to live among each other than they were a generation ago.

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Books
9:59 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Rick Najera: A Latino In Hollywood Is 'Almost White'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
9:46 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Estrogen May Not Help Prevent Fuzzy Thinking After Menopause

Hormones clearly influence a women's health, but figuring out how is a tricky business.
Andrew Ostrovsky iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 10:16 am

There's a widely held belief that women experience moodiness and fuzzy thinking because of the drop in estrogen during menopause. And women have looked to hormone replacement therapy for relief.

But researchers increasingly think there's not much of a link between declining levels of estrogen during menopause and cognition.

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All Tech Considered
9:44 am
Wed November 27, 2013

I Can Haz Spanish Lessons: Cat Pictures Now Have A Purpose

A screen shot from Cat Spanish, a new app by online learning company Memrise.
Courtesy of Cat Academy

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:09 am

In our Weekly Innovation series, we pick an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Have an innovation to share? Use our form.

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Parallels
9:40 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Swarming Thieves Wreak Havoc On Famed Rio Beaches

Municipal guards with batons chase a mob of thieves that snatched bags and wallets from beachgoers on Arpoador beach, adjacent to Ipanema, in Rio de Janeiro on Nov. 20.
Marcelo Carnaval AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 9:04 am

Amanda Maia was visiting Rio de Janeiro for the weekend earlier this month with her mother. It was a sunny day and so they went to Ipanema beach to catch some rays. She says she noticed a few groups of kids.

"There were lots of gangs, about 10, 15 children each; they were about 10 or 12 years old," Maia recalls.

At first, she says, they were just roaming the streets, checking people out. The ones she saw were smoking marijuana, too.

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Supermarket Tragedy Leads To Resignation Of Latvian Leader

Latvian Prime Minister Valdis Dombrovskis.
Yves Logghe AP

The collapse of a supermarket roof and the more than 50 deaths it caused last week has led Latvia's prime minister to announce he's stepping down.

"Latvia needs to have a government that will supported by the Saeima [parliament] majority and deal with the current situation in the nation," Prime Minister Valdis Dombrovskis said Wednesday, according to The Baltic Times.

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Parallels
9:17 am
Wed November 27, 2013

In Kenya, Corruption Is Widely Seen, Rarely Punished

Video footage shows what appears to be Kenyan soldiers carrying plastic shopping bags as they leave a supermarket at Westgate Mall during a terrorist attack in Nairobi on Sept. 21. Kenya's security forces have long been rated as among the most corrupt institutions in the country, but even jaded Kenyans were shocked by the CCTV footage.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 12:20 pm

Editor's Note: One out of three Africans paid a bribe in the past year to obtain a government document, get medical care, place kids in school or settle an issue with police, according to a recent survey. Police consistently attracted the highest ratings of corruption, including those in Kenya. NPR's Gregory Warner looks at the impact it has on the country.

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The Two-Way
9:15 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Please Send This Man Photos Of Snow On Your Patio Furniture

Just what Denver news anchor Kyle Clark doesn't want to see.
Kenneth Martin Landov

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 12:30 pm

If you haven't seen it yet, take a couple minutes to watch this video of Denver news anchor Kyle Clark's funny appeal to the people of Colorado to stop sending his TV station so many pictures of snow piled up on their patio furniture.

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