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The Two-Way
4:06 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Argentina Ditches Dutch On The Way To World Cup Final

Players go for the ball during the World Cup semifinal soccer match between the Netherlands and Argentina at the Itaquerao Stadium in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Wednesday.
Fabrizio Bensch AP

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 1:46 pm

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

Argentina defeated the Netherlands 4-2 in penalty kicks to reach the final of the World Cup, where they will play Germany on Sunday.

The two teams were tied 0-0 at the end of extra time.

Goalkeeper Sergio Romero saved penalties by Ron Vlaar and Wesley Sneijder. Maxi Rodriguez put away the winning kick.

The last time a World Cup semifinal was decided by penalty kicks was 1998 when Netherlands played Brazil. Brazil won that encounter.

The Associated Press reports:

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All Tech Considered
3:54 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

A User-Friendly Gardening System For The Plant-Challenged

SproutsIO Inc. allows people to easily grow fresh produce inside a home or office. The system is a spinoff of research done at the MIT Media Lab.
SproutsIO Inc.

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 5:10 pm

Don't have a green thumb but seeking the therapeutic nature of gardening? Want the convenience and satisfaction of growing your own produce at home? Not to worry: All you need is an electrical outlet, a flat surface and some water.

Meet SproutsIO Inc., a "plug-and-play" user-friendly microfarming appliance for people to easily grow fresh fruits and veggies inside their home or office.

Here's how it works:

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Iraq
3:44 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Amid Bloodshed, Brotherhood: Links Forged From Iraq's Game Of Rings

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

In Iraq, a Ramadan game called Mheibbis brings even Sunnis and Shiites together in peaceful competition. A ring game traditionally played between neighborhoods during the holy month, Mheibbis has offered men the opportunity to break Baghdad's tension and offer messages of unity and brotherhood — even between rival sects.

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Shots - Health News
3:23 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Do The World Cup's Fluttering Kicks Put Fans' Hearts At Risk?

Brazil fans in Rio de Janeiro watch in horror as Germany routs the home team in the World Cup semifinal match played Tuesday.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 2:35 pm

Brazil's cataclysmic World Cup loss to Germany broke the heart of a nation.

But for some fans, the emotional anguish may have felt all too real – resulting in heart attacks that not even the U.S.'s star goalie Tim Howard could stop.

A 2008 analysis published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that cardiac events skyrocketed during World Cup matches.

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Europe
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

In Germany, A Case Against Another Alleged American Spy

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Iraq
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

The Plight Of Mosul's Museum: Iraqi Antiquities At Risk Of Ruin

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Law
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Corruption Convictions Spell 10 Year Sentence For Former NOLA Mayor

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A federal judge has sentenced former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin to 10 years in prison for corruption conviction. The sentence was lighter than what prosecutors were seeking for the former two-term Democrat. NPR's Debbie Elliott covered Nagin's trial earlier this year, and she joins us now to talk about today's sentencing. Debbie, first remind us of what Ray Nagin was convicted of back in February.

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Asia
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

The Ballad Of The 13-Year-Old North Korean Capitalist

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In North Korea, private businesses are illegal - or at least they're technically illegal. People aren't supposed to buy and sell stuff to each other, but they do it anyway. NPR's Zoe Chace, of our Planet Money team, has this story of a young North Korean woman who knew a business opportunity when she saw it, and had no qualms about pursuing it. One word - socks.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: She's just 23 years old. Easily excited, she wears makeup, a bright pink dress, likes to speak a little bit of English.

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Book News & Features
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

In Dispute With Hachette, Amazon Aims New Volley At Authors

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 10:22 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. A fight between Amazon and the publishing company Hachette is getting nastier. Amazon suggested that while talks between the two companies continue, Hachette authors could get 100 percent of the sale price of their e-books. As NPR's Lynn Neary reports, it was an offer Hachette was quick to refuse.

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Politics
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Hobby Lobby Ruling Prompts Gay Rights Groups To Reject Prized Bill

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Politics
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Lawmakers Unearth Failures To Investigate Campus Sex Crimes

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

U.S. colleges are failing to investigate sex crimes on their campuses. That's the conclusion of a new national survey commissioned by U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill. The survey is part of an effort by several senators to reduce sexual assaults in college and change a culture where only 5 percent of victims report the crime. NPR's Laura Sullivan reports from the capital.

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The Salt
1:40 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Play With Your Food: The Kandinsky-Inspired Fine Art Food Challenge

Kazimir Malevich/Tretyakov Gallery; Beth Novey/NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 3:42 pm

We love to have fun with food, and as you may recall, we recently told you about a scientific experiment showing that people who ate a salad arranged like a Kandinsky painting said it tasted better and was worth more money than a typical pile of greens.

The experiment inspired us to challenge you to tweet pictures of your food as fine art. And boy, you delivered.

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Music
1:37 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

If Jim Lauderdale Is A Song, More People Should Hear It

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:46 pm

Jim Lauderdale's new album is called I'm A Song, a title that suggests his deep
immersion in songwriting. His compositions have been covered by singers ranging from George Strait to Solomon Burke, from the Dixie Chicks to Elvis Costello. Since his debut album in 1991, he's recorded more than 25 albums for a variety of record companies, and I'm A Song contains a generous 20 songs. Rock critic Ken Tucker says Lauderdale's career is at once admirable and somewhat puzzling.

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Television
1:37 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

'The Strain' And 'Extant' Play On Fears Of Forces Out Of Our Control

The threat is both viral and vampire in The Strain, a show about the sudden outbreak of a disease that kills most of its victims — then begins to mutate them into another species entirely.
Michael Gibson FX

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 3:02 pm

They say every generation gets the science fiction it deserves, built around its biggest and most primal fears. Well, maybe they don't say that — but they should. In the '50s, all those movies about mutant giant monsters going berserk were a way for us to channel our fears about the atomic bomb. In the same way, in that same decade, all those body-snatcher movies were about being unable to tell friend from foe, or trust even your closest loved ones — the perfect paranoid parable for the Communist witch-hunting era.

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The Salt
1:37 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Biologist Says Promoting Diversity Is Key To 'Keeping The Bees'

The decline of honeybees has been attributed to a variety of causes, from nasty parasites to the stress of being transported from state to state to feed on various crops in need of pollination.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:32 pm

Every year, more than half of the honeybee hives in the United States are taken to California to pollinate the state's almond crop.

Biologist Laurence Packer says this illustrates both our dependence on honeybees to pollinate many plants people rely on for food and the devastating decline in the domestic honeybee population in recent years.

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