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Ask Me Another
11:24 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Candy Crush

Sweet, dude. Celebrities get the sugar rush-treatment in this mashup game that combines your favorite candies with well-known people. Which rap & rock star shouts "Bawitdaba!" as he battles the tart, acidic flavor of his favorite chewy candy?

Heard in Wet Hot American Summer: Batteries Not Included

Ask Me Another
11:24 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

First Day Of Camp

The cast of Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp on the AMA stage in Central Park
Mike Katzif NPR

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Ask Me Another
11:24 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Why You Buggin'?

It's summertime, and you know what that means: lots of time outside, and lots of bug bites to go with it. Grab your DEET-free bug spray for this final round — every answer here is an insect, arthropod, or arachnid.

Heard in Wet Hot American Summer: Batteries Not Included

The Two-Way
7:18 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Debris In The Indian Ocean May Have Come From Vanished Airliner

A piece of a wing, apparently from a Boeing 777, has been found on Reunion, an island in the Indian Ocean. It's not clear yet whether the debris is from the Malaysia Airlines jet that disappeared from radar during a flight last year.
Yannick Pitou AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 11:46 am

Authorities on the French island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean have found debris that may be from a missing Malaysia Airlines jet.

A source familiar with the investigation tells NPR's Geoff Brumfiel that the debris appears to have come from a large passenger aircraft, but it remains unclear whether it's from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which vanished from radar on March 8, 2014.

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Arts & Life
6:56 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

With 'Paper Towns,' Author John Green Reopens Search For Agloe, N.Y.

Booklist American Library Association

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 11:24 am

Agloe, N.Y., is a place suspended between fiction and reality.

The town started showing up on maps in the 1930s, but it's actually a "paper town," or a fake town created by cartographers to catch those who might copy their work. Mapmakers Otto G. Lindberg and Ernest Alpers came up with the name by rearranging their initials.

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Obama Administration Officials Take The 'Malign' Line On Iran

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 6:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sports
5:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Mexico's Soccer Coach Fired After Punching TV Reporter

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 6:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Your Money
5:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

From The Silents To Millennials, Debt Burdens Span The Generations

Alyson Hurt and Paige Pfleger NPR

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 12:57 pm

For most of us, debt is a big part of life. According to a new study by Pew Charitable Trusts, 80 percent of Americans have some form of debt — from student loans to credit card balances.

There are many among the so-called silent generation, those born before World War II, who are still paying off mortgages and credit cards.

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Sports
5:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

After Boston Drops Olympic Bid, U.S. Committee Scrambles To Find New Choice

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 6:56 pm

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Energy
5:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Greenpeace Activists Protest Shell Oil's Plan To Drill In The Arctic Ocean

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 5:47 pm

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The Salt
5:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Europe's Taste For Caviar Is Putting Pressure On A Great Lakes Fish

Lake herring roe at the Dockside Fish Market in Grand Marais, Minn. Some workers at the market call it "Lake Superior Gold."
Derek Montgomery for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 6:56 pm

Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world, by surface area, and it has something the other Great Lakes do not: stable populations of mostly native fish species.

But scientists say a key fish in Superior's food web is now in trouble because of mild winters and an appetite for caviar in Europe.

There wasn't much demand for lake herring 10 years ago. It used to be fed to mink and used as fertilizer, according to Craig Hoopman, a commercial fisherman in Wisconsin who fishes around Lake Superior's Apostle Islands.

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The Two-Way
4:50 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

SpaceShipTwo 'Pilot Was Thrown From The Vehicle' High In Atmosphere

A photo released by Virgin Galactic shows a badly injured SpaceShipTwo pilot Peter Siebold drifting under his parachute after last October's accident that destroyed the spacecraft during a test flight.
Mark Greenberg Virgin Galactic

The dramatic failure of a test flight by Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo rocket last October cost the co-pilot his life and left the pilot severely injured. New data from investigators suggest that the pilot survived in part because the craft essentially came apart around him.

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Movie Interviews
4:34 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

At 79, Woody Allen Says There's Still Time To Do His Best Work

When asked about his major shortcomings, filmmaker Woody Allen says, "I'm lazy and an imperfectionist."
Thibault Camus AP

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 9:40 am

Woody Allen is a prolific filmmaker — he's been releasing films pretty much every year since the mid-1960s. (His latest, Irrational Man, is now in theaters.) But Allen isn't exactly prolific as an interview subject. When film critic Sam Fragoso sat down with Allen in Chicago, the filmmaker revealed his insecurities (well, not so much revealed as reiterated), and discussed why actors like to work with him and what he regrets.

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Code Switch
4:02 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Once Outlaws, Young Lords Find A Museum Home For Radical Roots

Johanna Fernández, co-curator of a new exhibition about the Young Lords, points to pages of the group's newspaper on display at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 6:56 pm

They were under watch by the FBI and the New York Police Department. And by the early 1970s, the Young Lords emerged as one of the country's most prominent radical groups led by Latino activists.

Inspired by the Black Panthers, a band of young Puerto Ricans wanted to form a Latino counterpart to the black nationalist group. In fact, one of the founding Young Lords in New York City almost started a group called the "Brown Tigers."

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Goats and Soda
3:53 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

One Point Of View On How Lions Can Earn Money For Africa

Tourists on safari watch three young lions in Kenya's Masai Mara National Reserve.
Beverly Joubert National Geographic/Getty Images

A beloved lion in Zimbabwe — Cecil was his name — was wounded with a crossbow, then later shot dead. The animal had reportedly been lured from Hwange National Park, a protected area.

The dentist who killed the lion said he believes it was a legal hunt, for which he reportedly paid $50,000.

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