National & World News from NPR

A Film Lover's Travel Guide

Sep 23, 2016

Jonathan and Ophira read entries from a travel guide; all you have to do is figure out what city they're describing. Easy enough, except that this travel guide was written by someone who never left their home, and only researched the cities by watching movies.

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Herb, My Little Pony, Or Enya Song?

Sep 23, 2016

In this edition of This, That or the Other, contestants must guess: is it a culinary herb, a My Little Pony character, or an Enya song?

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Mystery Guest

Sep 23, 2016

Ophira and Jonathan become the contestants in a round of Mystery Guest! Tim League owns a business that he's bringing to New York City. Ophira and Jonathan must figure out what Tim's business is by asking yes-or-no questions.

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Something, James Something

Sep 23, 2016

"Joyce. James Joyce." That's how you'd respond to Jonathan Coulton singing about the author of Finnegan's Wake. We rewrote James Bond movie themes to be about other famous people named James. Score a bonus point by identifying the Bond theme!

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Mr. Mojo Risin'

Sep 23, 2016

Strap in, everybody, because it's time for ANAGRAMS ON THE RADIO! We decided to inject a little rock-n-roll into our anagram game by adding the most famous anagrammed name in rock — Mr. Mojo Risin', the anagram for The Doors' lead singer Jim Morrison. The answer we're looking for is an anagram of the last word you hear. It's like we're giving you the answers!

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Sep 23, 2016

Natasha Lyonne premiered three movies in two weeks--Yoga Hosers, a Kevin Smith comedy/horror film about two girls who fight Canadian Nazis in the form of sausages; Antibirth, a horror farce about a party girl who finds herself pregnant with a demon after a crazy night; and Intervention, about a group of friends who come together to give a couple a marriage intervention. "That's my genre," she told host Ophira Eisenberg, of the off-beat projects she's been involved in.

Sharing Pairing

Sep 23, 2016

In this final round, every answer is a rhyming pair of words. The second word is created by changing the first letter of the first word. For example, if we said, "a non-competitive race for charity," you'd answer, "Fun Run."

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

[In case you haven't heard, Pop Culture Happy Hour is embarking on a West Coast tour! San Francisco, Seattle and Los Angeles are sold out — though we recently added an appearance (with Guy Branum!) at the Now Hear This podcast festival in Anaheim on Oct. 29 — but we'll also be in Portland on Oct. 19 with our dear pal Audie Cornish.

A Complete Guide To Early And Absentee Voting

Sep 23, 2016


What Does Early Voting Data Tell Us?

For those who can't wait to get this election over with, there's good news — early voting is starting.

The bad news: That only applies to you if you live in one of 37 states that offer some kind of early voting (in person, absentee or by mail) without an excuse needed.

More than 1 in 3 people is expected to cast a ballot early this year. On Friday, voters in Minnesota and South Dakota can start turning in absentee ballots. On Saturday, they can do so in Vermont, and ballots will go out in New Jersey.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be together on stage for the first time on Monday. Both candidates have a lot at stake when they meet at Hofstra University in New York for the first of three presidential debates, this one with moderator Lester Holt of NBC News.

Each has different opportunities and challenges in the debates. Here are four things Clinton will have to think about. We also looked at four things to watch for Trump.

On Monday, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off in their first debate at Hofstra University in New York. In a race this close and with as many as 100 million people watching, the debates present both candidates with chances to seize momentum but potential pitfalls as well.

Here are four things to think about as Donald Trump prepares for the debates. We also looked at four things to watch for Clinton.

Keeping The Dead In Their Place

Sep 23, 2016

Runaway coffins. It's an issue floating to the surface with increasing frequency in Louisiana. It happened again last month when two feet of rain fell in less than 72 hours in some parts of the state. Towns were flooded — as were their cemeteries.

Back in the 1980s, Davao City was a largely lawless city on the largely lawless island of Mindanao, known to the wider world mostly for its Muslim and communist insurgencies.

In 1948, Atlanta added eight black men to its police force. This was at a time when, as author Thomas Mullen explains, a 1947 Newsweek article "estimated that one-quarter of Atlanta policemen were, in fact, members of the Ku Klux Klan."

Those pioneer police officers were the inspiration for Mullen's new novel, Darktown — a blend of history, mystery and violence that explores racial tensions in post-World War II Atlanta.

Hip-hop artist Amisho Baraka, who performs as Sho Baraka, is one African-American man who feels left out by both major political parties — and he says this will affect his vote come November.

American lives have been getting steadily longer, and since the 1960s that trend has been driven mostly by a remarkable reduction in heart disease. But those improvements have slowed dramatically. Scientists are now wondering whether we're approaching the end of the trend of longer, healthier lives.

That's because the steady decline in heart disease is fading.

Almost two decades ago, Dr. Lars Aanning sat on the witness stand in a medical malpractice trial and faced a dilemma.

The South Dakota surgeon had been called to vouch for the expertise of one of his partners whose patient had suffered a stroke and permanent disability after an operation. The problem was that Aanning had, in his own mind, questioned his colleague's skill. His partner's patients had suffered injuries related to his procedures. But Aanning understood why his partner's attorney had called him as a witness: Doctors don't squeal on doctors.

Harvard University reported that its endowment fund saw a loss of 2 percent, or $1.9 billion, on its investments for fiscal 2016. It's the single largest annual decline since the financial crisis.

The shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, a 43-year-old African-American man, by Charlotte, N.C., police is under investigation and the circumstances are very much in dispute, but when you listen to protesters, you hear that their frustration isn't about just this one case.

Betty Shelby, the Tulsa Police Department officer who shot and killed Terence Crutcher, is being charged with first-degree manslaughter in the case, Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler says.

Kunzweiler announced the charge Thursday afternoon, six days after Crutcher died in a controversial encounter that was captured on video by a police helicopter camera and dashboard cameras.

If you looked at Google Maps this week, you might have noticed something strange: less green.

Typically, mint green highlights designate publicly owned wild spaces on Google's maps. But as of this writing, some of those public lands have gone gray. The locations are still searchable, but if you don't already know the park or forest exists, and where exactly, you might not be able to find it.

It's almost a year to the day since world leaders committed to meeting 17 "Sustainable Development Goals" by 2030, from wiping out extreme poverty to fighting disease and inequality.

Perhaps they should have added an 18th goal — compiling all the data needed to achieve the other goals.

This data gap has been the talk among advocates for the poor this week as the U.N. General Assembly's current session got underway. It was at last year's General Assembly that the 17 goals were set.

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