National & World News from NPR

President Trump is in a peculiar position: He runs the country, advised by his daughter and son-in-law — while also profiting from his own worldwide Trump Organization, run by his sons.

Are We There Yet?

Apr 28, 2017

In honor of our long flight from Brooklyn to Phoenix, this final round is called, "Are We There Yet?" Every answer contains something that sounds like a method of transportation. For example, if we said, "This astronomer was the original narrator of the science show, 'Cosmos,'" you'd answer "Carl Sagan..." which has "car" in it.

Heard on Penn Jillette: Fool Us Once

Mystery Guest

Apr 28, 2017

Our Mystery Guest Stacey Gordon has an interesting job that takes her from Phoenix to a street in New York City. Can you guess what it is before Ophira and Jonathan?

Heard on Penn Jillette: Fool Us Once

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Things With Wings

Apr 28, 2017

Inspired by the 1980s band from Phoenix, Arizona, house musician Jonathan Coulton takes us under his wing for the Mr. Mister parody the world's been waiting for! We rewrote their hit song "Broken Wings" to be about things...with wings.

Heard on Penn Jillette: Fool Us Once

Rinse, Pete, Repeat

Apr 28, 2017

This word game is inspired by our favorite prefix! We invented alternate definitions for words that start with "re." If we said, "I GIVE UP trying to WRITE MY NAME at the bottom of this letter," you would say, "Re-sign" or "resign."

Heard on Penn Jillette: Fool Us Once

Penn Jillette: Fool Us Once

Apr 28, 2017

Magician Penn Jillette prefers tricks to illusions: "which is just gluing two front surface mirrors together at 45 degree angles, and then the sides look like the back!" He doesn't particularly like spending time with his stage partner Teller: "We wanted to work together, but there was no sort of affection." And he doesn't even like magic: "I was never fond of it."

Daylight Saving Time Travel

Apr 28, 2017

Fun fact! Phoenix, Arizona does not recognize Daylight Saving Time! So we wrote an audio quiz with clips from famous works involving time travel.

Heard on Penn Jillette: Fool Us Once

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Click-Bait And Switch

Apr 28, 2017

Many people don't like learning about history, but they DO like reading Buzzfeed articles about kittens. To get more people interested in history, we've written clickbait-style headlines for important historical events. Contestants ring in to guess the event — but what happens after that will SHOCK you.

Heard on Penn Jillette: Fool Us Once

When Chris Ategeka was a boy of 7 in Uganda, his parents died of HIV/AIDS. And his brother, not yet 5, died of malaria.

Today he's 32. He's got a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley (where he was the commencement speaker for the college of engineering at his graduation in 2011). With his entrepreneurial spirit, he could have followed classmates to Silicon Valley.

But he didn't.

In his TED Fellows talk in Vancouver this week, he explained how his personal history set him on a different path.

We're always excited for the beginning of summer movie season. Despite the fact that it's almost guaranteed to contain some major disappointments and jarring disasters, we often find goofy fun, sharp writing and new stars blowing up (sometimes literally) our cinematic seasons.

The U.S. economy grew at just a 0.7 percent annual rate in the first quarter of this year, according to the latest report on the gross domestic product from the Commerce Department. That's below market expectations and indicates the economy grew at the slowest pace in three years.

Weak auto sales and lower home-heating bills dragged down consumer spending, offsetting a pickup in investment led by housing and oil drilling. Employment costs rose 0.8 percent in the first quarter.

President Trump says that while he would like to resolve the issue of North Korea's nuclear program diplomatically, it will be hard — and there is a potential for a major clash with the Asian nation, Trump said in an interview with Reuters.

"There's a chance that we could end up having a major, major conflict with North Korea, absolutely," the president told the news agency. "We'd love to solve things diplomatically but it's very difficult."

A female terrorism suspect is in the hospital in Britain after being shot during a police raid Thursday, and officials say they believe they've "contained the threats" posed by the woman and others. The raid came on the same day a man was arrested for carrying weapons near the U.K. Parliament.

The two developments are unrelated, Scotland Yard's senior national counterterrorism coordinator Neil Basu said in a briefing Friday morning, one day after what he called it "an extraordinary day in London." Police had stopped an active terrorism plot, he told reporters.

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Shortly before last year's election, presidential candidate Donald Trump made a commitment for how he would start off if elected.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

"Marcus Gavius Apicius purchased me on a day hot enough to fry sausage on the market stones."

So begins the tale of Thrasius, the fictional narrator of Feast of Sorrow. Released this week, the novel is based on the real life of ancient Roman noble Marcus Gavius Apicius, who is thought to have inspired and contributed to the world's oldest surviving cookbook, a ten-volume collection titled Apicius.

What makes a high-quality learning program effective not just for the child but the whole family? What else, besides a well-run pre-K, is essential to help families break out of intergenerational poverty?

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And as we were listening to the secretary just now, Joel Wit was listening, too. He's a former U.S. diplomat who once negotiated with North Korea. He's on the line from New York. Good morning.

JOEL WIT: Good morning.

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When President Donald Trump selected retired Marine Gen. James Mattis for defense secretary, it was a rare choice. No recently retired general had been selected for the top Pentagon job since George Marshall, some 66 years earlier.

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We're here to give you your first word on the day's news. And Steve, a pretty crowded day in the confrontation over North Korea's nuclear weapons.

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Paula Hawkins' 2015 book — The Girl on the Train — was a massive bestseller. A tense domestic thriller with a boozy, unstable narrator, it caught the imagination of a reading public desperate for the kinds of dark deeds and desperate women Gillian Flynn pioneered in Gone Girl a few years earlier.

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Here is a proposition that may seem self-evident to many people: As societies become more modern, religion loses its grip. People separate their religion from their institutions and from parts of their lives.

Sociologists have a name for this idea. They call it the "secularization thesis." Now, research suggests the story is more complicated.

In 1822, Thomas Jefferson suggested an early version of it, predicting that Unitarianism "will, ere long, be the religion of the majority from north to south."

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Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET.

President Trump spoke to the National Rifle Association's annual leadership forum on Friday, the first sitting president since Ronald Reagan to do so.

"We have news that you've been waiting for ... a long time," Trump told the crowd in Atlanta. "The eight-year assault on your Second Amendment freedoms has come to a crashing end."

Much of his speech echoed the rhetoric he used on the campaign, and has continued at rallies during his first 100 days in office.

In his first interview with NPR, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has a wide-ranging interview with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep.

Steve Inskeep: I want to begin with North Korea. We heard when you said, "the era of strategic patience is over," so we know what your policy is not. Is there a word or phrase you can give us to say what your approach to North Korea is?

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson: Yes, our approach to North Korea is to have them change their posture towards any future talks.

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