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Monkey See
5:07 am
Tue September 30, 2014

'Gone Girl': A Missing Wife And A Cloud Of Suspicion

Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) finds himself the chief suspect behind the shocking disappearance of his wife Amy (Rosamund Pike), on their fifth anniversary.
Merrick Morton Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 11:40 am

At the opening of Gone Girl, Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) is literally a man on the street. Standing by his trash cans in the half-light of an early morning at his gorgeous Missouri home in a T-shirt and sweatpants, he is what might be mistaken for "comfortable," but he is painfully, powerfully ordinary. And in keeping with the title, he is about to learn that his wife, Amy (Rosamund Pike), is missing. Suspicious to both the authorities and the audience, Nick has lost his wife to either an act of violence he committed or an act of violence he did not commit.

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NPR Story
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Hong Kong Protesters Give Government A Deadline To Respond

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 12:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

China Sentences Professor Accused Of Separatist Activities

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 12:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Hong Kong protests come while China's government cracks down on another movement. They're the Uighers of western China.

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Goats and Soda
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Martha Zarway Of Monrovia: 'I'm A Doctor, So We Can't Run Away'

Liberian physician Martha Zarway continues work in a temporary clinic while her original facility is disinfected.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 12:46 pm

As U.S. troops begin arriving in Liberia to help contain the regional spread of Ebola, a physician in the capital is grappling with the virus upfront.

Dr. Martha Zarway's life turned upside down when one of her clinic staff members — a friend — died on Sept. 2 amid rumors that the cause of death was Ebola.

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NPR Ed
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Kids And Screen Time: Cutting Through The Static

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 4:40 pm

The walls are lined with robots and movie posters for Star Wars and Back to the Future. But this is no 1980s nerd den. It's the technology lab at Westside Neighborhood School in Los Angeles, and the domain of its ed-tech coordinator, Don Fitz-Roy.

"So we're gonna be talking about digital citizenship today."

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Goats and Soda
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Tests Of New Ebola Drugs Could Take Place As Early As November

Some potential new Ebola drugs will be tested at treatment centers like this one run by Doctors Without Borders near Monrovia.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 12:46 pm

Health officials are gearing up to test drugs and vaccines against Ebola in West Africa, and they hope to start within two months. That's an ambitious timeline for a process that often takes years. The challenge is to move forward as quickly as possible while minimizing the risks that come with unproven drugs and vaccines.

Right now there are no proven medications. But researchers have been working methodically for years on vaccines that could protect people from the Ebola virus — and drugs that could treat the sick.

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Law
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

U.S. Judge Holds Argentina In Contempt After Debt Default

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 12:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Politics
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

In Michigan, A Low-Key Campaign For A High-Stakes Senate Seat

Terri Lynn Land walks in the Labor Day Parade in Romeo, Mich., on Sept. 1. Land has made some public appearances like this one but overall is running a low-key race in the state.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 1:33 pm

Republicans see a chance for a takeover of the Senate this November, and they are hoping the path to victory leads through Michigan. That's where six-term Democratic Sen. Carl Levin is retiring.

Even though Democrats dominate the state in the presidential elections, the GOP does much better in midterms when voter turnout is lower.

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Politics
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Secret Service Director To Face Tough Question At House Hearing

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 12:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This is one of those questions that is perfect for a congressional hearing, though not so perfect for the witness. The question is how a man managed to get so far onto the White House grounds.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Research News
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Certain English Errors May Decipher Clues To Dying Languages

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 12:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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The Salt
2:38 am
Tue September 30, 2014

European Activists Say They Don't Want Any U.S. 'Chlorine Chicken'

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 12:46 pm

Mute Schimpf doesn't want to eat American chicken. That's because most U.S. poultry is chilled in antimicrobial baths that can include chlorine to keep salmonella and other bacteria in check. In Europe, chlorine treatment was banned in the 1990s out of fear that it could cause cancer.

"In Europe there is definitely a disgust about chlorinated chicken," says Schimpf, a food activist with Friends of the Earth Europe, an environmental group.

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Shots - Health News
2:35 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Vaccine Controversies Are As Social As They Are Medical

Daniela Chavarriaga holds her daughter Emma as Dr. Jose Rosa-Olivares administers a measles vaccination at Miami Children's Hospital.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 4:14 pm

When essayist Eula Biss was pregnant with her son, she decided she wanted to do just a bit of research into vaccination. "I thought I would do a small amount of research to answer some questions that had come up for me," she tells NPR's Audie Cornish. "And the questions just got bigger the more I learned and the more I read."

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:05 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Domesticated Robots And The Art Of Being Human

These little robots, called BlabDroids, ask people questions and video record their replies. The footage will be used to create a documentary.
Courtesy of Alexander Reben

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 2:08 am

In the 1960s — well before Spike Jonze's Samantha — MIT computer scientist Joseph Weizenbaum introduced the world to Eliza, a psychotherapist (of sorts) who interacted with people through a text interface. She's still around today.

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Deceptive Cadence
8:04 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Three Quick Lessons From The Violin Wunderkind Who Became A Master

"The key is to figure out what you're contributing," Joshua Bell says of playing chamber music.
Eric Kabik Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 5:30 pm

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The Two-Way
6:42 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

U.S. Charges Pakistani Man With Conspiracy Over His Spyware App

A customer inspects the new iPhone.
Lintao Zhang Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 8:31 am

In what it is calling the first criminal case of its kind, the Justice Department said it had charged a Pakistani man with conspiracy over the sale and advertising of a smart phone app that could monitor calls, texts, videos, location and other communication of an unsuspecting user.

Hammad Akbar, 31, of Lahore, Pakistan, is the owner of the company that sells an app called StealthGenie.

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