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Sweetness And Light
9:03 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

The NFL's Lesson: There's No Replacing Good Refs

Referee Walt Anderson makes a call in the Chicago Bears game against the Dallas Cowboys Monday, ending the NFL's first full slate of games with its regular officials.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:14 am

So, we found out that the National Football League is too big to fail. But not so big that it couldn't make a complete fool of itself and show to the world that its owners are stingy, greedy nincompoops.

Not so big that it couldn't make its commissioner, Roger Goodell, stand out in front, looking lost and small, so that their erstwhile tough-guy commander suddenly became an errand boy, losing respect and dignity that will be hard to regain the next time he needs it.

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It's All Politics
6:39 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Setbacks For Voter ID Laws in Pa., Other States Could Be Short-Lived

Emily Goldberg, with her daughter, Willa, 2, holds up a sign during the NAACP voter ID rally to protest against Pennsylvania's voter ID law on Sept. 13. Tuesday, a judge ordered that the law not be enforced in the Nov. 6 presidential election.
Michael Perez AP

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 7:23 pm

Civil rights groups are cheering the injunction placed on the Pennsylvania voter identification law, but their recent victories against state photo ID measures very likely won't last beyond Election Day.

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The Two-Way
5:44 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Mike McQueary Files Lawsuit Against Penn State

Penn State assistant football coach Mike McQueary.
Chris Gardner Getty Images

Mike McQueary, the graduate assistant who witnessed former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky showering with a boy, has filed a lawsuit against Penn State University for defamation and misrepresentation.

The AP reports:

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
5:14 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

'Million-Dollar Blocks' Map Incarceration's Costs

Bernard Goutier, 25, has served time in prison twice. He's now learning construction skills with Emerge Connecticut, which offers paid on-the-job training, literacy classes and support groups to ex-offenders.
Uma Ramiah for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 7:16 pm

In many neighborhoods, hard truths about day-to-day life — like violent streets or crumbling schools — are readily apparent to residents, but less obvious to city and state officials.

Hard data can sometimes bridge that gap, helping policymakers better visualize which communities are doing well, and which may need additional help or resources.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:35 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Vitamin D No Help For Colds

Sorry the vitamin D didn't help.
Michael Kemter iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 8:53 am

Should you take Vitamin D supplements to prevent colds and shorten the misery?

Like other theories about the benefits of vitamin D, it seems like a reasonably good idea. After all, some lab studies suggest vitamin D might enhance immunity. And as everybody knows, people are more prone to respiratory infections during winter, when they cover up and get less vitamin D-generating sunlight.

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The Message Machine
4:24 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Campaigns Targeting Hispanics, But With Tight Focus

A volunteer hands out buttons before first lady Michelle Obama speaks at a Hispanic caucus on Sept. 5 in Charlotte, N.C.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 5:17 pm

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Europe
4:20 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Opposition Victory Signals New Direction For Georgia

Georgian billionaire and opposition leader Bidzina Ivanishvili (left) reacts with supporters at his office on Monday. Ivanishvili defeated Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili in the election, clearing the way for a new government.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 5:14 pm

Parliamentary elections in Georgia, the former Soviet republic, delivered a resounding defeat for the ruling party of President Mikheil Saakashvili on Monday. Preliminary election results showed the opposition winning 57 percent of the vote.

A day later, the president conceded defeat. In a televised address, Saakashvili said he respected the decision of the voters, and that he would clear the way for the opposition Georgian Dream party to form a new government, a move that would install opposition leader Bidzina Ivanishvili as prime minister.

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:20 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Turning Data Into Action With 'Million-Dollar Blocks'

Certain truths about life in a neighborhood are readily apparent to people who live there, but less obvious to city and state officials. The Justice Mapping Center uses data to help bridge that gap with information about the prison system. By mapping the residential addresses of every inmate in various prison systems, Eric Cadora and his colleagues have made vividly clear a concept they call "Million-Dollar Blocks." In some places more than a million dollars are being spent every year to incarcerate the residents of a single Census block. Audie Cornish talks with Eric Cadora.

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Author Interviews
4:20 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

In 'House,' Erdrich Sets Revenge On A Reservation

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 5:14 pm

In 1988, 13-year-old Joe Coutts is thrust into adulthood after his mother, Geraldine Coutts, is sexually assaulted. His story is at the center of Louise Erdrich's latest novel, The Round House.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Syria, Running Low On Friends, Angrily Sheds Another

Palestinian Hamas leader Khaled Mashaal was a close ally of Syria and lived in the capital Damascus for years. But relations soured over the uprising in Syria, and Syria's state television denounced him in withering terms. Mashaal is shown speaking at a conference in Turkey on Sunday.
Kayhan Ozer AP

Originally published on Sun October 7, 2012 7:23 am

As the bloodletting in Syria carries on, President Bashar Assad's government doesn't have a lot of allies left.

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It's All Politics
3:55 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

A Poll's Query About Partisan Bias Of Pollsters Finds The Tilt Is With Voters

iStockphoto.com

You can believe this latest poll result if you'd like. Or not.

A survey released Tuesday that was conducted by Public Policy Polling asked people if they thought pollsters were rigging their results to show President Obama leading Mitt Romney (h/t Josh Voorhees at The Slatest).

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Middle East
3:47 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Panic Rises In Iran As Currency Plunges To New Lows

An Iranian man checks the rates of foreign currencies at a currency exchange bureau in central Tehran on Sept. 29. The Iranian currency lost nearly one-third of its value in a day over the weekend.
Maryam Rahmanian UPI/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 5:14 pm

Large crowds of anxious Iranians gathered in Tehran on Sunday and Monday at foreign exchange offices — some of which had shuttered their doors — as Iran's currency continues its free fall.

From Sunday to Monday, the rial lost nearly one-third of its value against the dollar — and the decline appears to have continued Tuesday.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Sept. 11 Documentarian Wins MacArthur Genius Grant

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 5:14 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Nope, Jimmy Hoffa Wasn't Buried Underneath That Michigan Driveway

Still Missing: Jimmy Hoffa on July 24, 1975. He disappeared six days later.
Tony Spina MCT /Landov

The 37-year-old search for Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa will continue.

As Mark reported last week, the search for Hoffa turned to a driveway in Roseville, Mich. Police took "soil core" samples after they received a "credible" tip that someone was buried there right around the time Hoffa went missing.

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Music News
2:52 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Waylon Jennings: The 'Last Recordings' Of A Dreamer

Goin' Down Rockin': The Last Recordings is a new album of songs by Waylon Jennings, who died in 2002.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 5:14 pm

Known for his gritty baritone, Waylon Jennings embodied the outlaw side of country music. He was 64 when he died of complications from diabetes, leaving behind a collection of vocal tracks that remained unfinished until now.

"It was almost shocking when I first heard it," says the singer Jessi Colter, who was married to Jennings for more than 30 years. "It took me several times to be able to listen to it. It sounded like he was there, that he's opening his heart to you, and he's telling you how he feels."

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