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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Ukraine Rebel Leader Claims New Attack On Mariupol

Ukrainian servicemen stand guard on a street near a burning building after a shelling by pro-Russian rebels of a residential sector in Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, on Saturday.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 12:30 pm

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

A main leader of Russian-backed rebels in eastern Ukraine reportedly says the separatists have launched an attack on the port city of Mariupol, where rocket fire killed at least 15 people in an open-air market and residential area.

"Today an offensive was launched on Mariupol. This will be the best possible monument to all our dead," Alexander Zakharchenko was quoted as saying by Russia's RIA news agency.

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Fine Art
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

As U.S. Reengages With Cuba, Art Museums Make a Trade

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

In Argentinian Murder Mystery, Prosecutor's Death Spawns Many Suspects

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 2:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Remembering Ernie Banks, A Fan Favorite Whose Favorite Was The Fans

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 10:29 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Facebook Aims To Weed Fakes From Your News Feed

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:11 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Media
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

From A Frequent Flier To SkyMall, Thanks For The Memory Foams

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:08 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Why A Black Man's Murder Often Goes Unpunished In Los Angeles

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:15 am

In the State of the Union this week, President Obama noted that crime in America is down. "For the first time in 40 years," he said, "the crime rate and the incarceration rate have come down together."

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Politics
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

U.S. Once Had Universal Child Care, But Rebuilding It Won't Be Easy

Julie Byard, head of a Detroit nursery, tells children stories and sings them songs prior to their afternoon nap in 1942.
AP

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:41 pm

Stumping in Kansas after his State of the Union, the president said that for most parents working today, child care is more than a "side issue," and that improving access "is a national economic priority for all of us."

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Asia
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Obama's India Visit Arrives At A Moment Of Optimism

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 3:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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The Two-Way
7:10 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Obama To Cut Short India Visit For Stop In Saudi Arabia

A National Cadet Corps cadet walks past the saluting base during the full dress rehearsal for Republic Day parades in Kolkata, India, on Saturday. President Obama will be the chief guest at the parade.
Bikas Das AP

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 12:33 pm

President Obama will cut short a trip to India to make room on his itinerary to visit Saudi Arabia to pay respects to the late King Abdullah, who died on Friday.

Obama was scheduled to arrive in New Delhi on Sunday and spend three days in India at the invitation of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, a trip that was to have included a visit to the Taj Mahal.

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Shots - Health News
6:59 am
Sat January 24, 2015

App Links Sex Assault Survivors To Help, But Who Downloads It?

The UASK app helps sexually assaulted college students in D.C. access a range of services, from rides to the hospital to phone numbers for counselors. The information is personalized to their school. Another version of the app, ASK, provides the same resources to non-students.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:14 am

Maya Weinstein is now a happy, bubbly junior at the George Washington University. But she says that two years ago, just a few weeks after she arrived on campus as a freshman, she was sexually assaulted by a fellow student.

"It was one of those 'acquaintance rape' things that people forget about, even though they are way more common," she says.

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Author Interviews
6:59 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Two Outcasts Form An Artistic Bond In 'Mr. Mac And Me'

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:16 am

Thomas Maggs is a lonely little boy. When Esther Freud's new novel Mr. Mac And Me opens, he is 13 years old. His brothers have died, his father, who runs a bar, drinks too much of his own stock and beats his son. Thomas dreams of sailing away – and then World War I descends on his small English sea coast town. Tours stop coming, blackout curtains go up, village boys enlist and go off to war.

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Code Switch
6:56 am
Sat January 24, 2015

A Japanese Singing Competition Blooms In Colorado

Two performers rehearse a traditional Japanese dance for Denver's 2015 Kohaku Uta Gassen.
Chloe Veltman KCFR

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:00 am

At a Buddhist temple in downtown Denver, Junko Higdon is rehearsing a traditional song for one of the local Japanese community's biggest annual events.

Higdon is one of 30 amateur singers competing in two teams at this year's Kohaku Uta Gassen, which means, "red and white singing battle."

"White is for the men, red is for the women and whoever gets the most points out the teams wins the trophy," she says.

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Goats and Soda
6:03 am
Sat January 24, 2015

'En Garde' Takes On New Urgency In A Duel With Machetes

Machete master Alfred Avril instructs his son, Jean-Paul.
Richard Patterson Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 7:16 am

Two men are sparring on a wooded slope in Haiti. Each has one hand behind his back. From afar, it looks as if they're fencing. But instead of using swords, the men are wielding machetes.

Yes, you read that right. They are aiming machetes at each other.

The older man is "Professor" Alfred Avril, a 70-year-old Haitian farmer who is also a master of tire machet, or Haitian machete fencing. He's quick but deliberate in his movements. His son and student, Jean-Paul, sways backward, descending to the ground to dodge the strikes.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Do You Have To Read 'Frog?' No, But You Might Want To

Mo Yan won the Nobel Prize for literature in 2012.
Yin Li

There are books you read because you want to read them and there are books you read because you have to read them. The former category can include anything that tickles your particular fancies — teenage wizards, goopy aliens, hunky Scotsmen, shark attack survivors, the history of Vladislav's Wallachia, whatever Malcolms your Cowley.

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