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The Salt
11:18 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Mapping The Microbes That Flourish On Fruits And Veggies

You call it salad. The bacteria call it home.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 12:06 pm

Deadly microbes like salmonella and E. coli can lurk on the surface of spinach, lettuce and other fresh foods. But many more benign microbes also flourish there, living lives of quiet obscurity, much like the tiny Whos in Dr. Seuss' Whoville. Until now.

Scientists at the University of Colorado have taken what may be the first broad inventory of the microbes that live on strawberries, lettuce, tomatoes and eight other popular fresh foods.

It turns out the invisible communities living on our food vary greatly, depending on the type and whether it's conventional or organic.

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Around the Nation
11:00 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Maybe We Should Retire The Word 'Retire'

The official portrait of retirement has changed, and it didn't change to this.
iStockphoto.com

Retirement ads are everywhere these days. The Villages lures retirees to come live, love and golf in Florida. USAA offers financial counsel to retiring military personnel.

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Krulwich Wonders...
11:00 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Six-Legged Critters In Dicey Places: What Science Reporters Do To Get Your Attention

YouTube

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:19 pm

We're not as daring as Magellan (who died) or Columbus (who went crazy) or Henry Hudson (who froze), but in our dainty little way, we take astonishing risks. Well, maybe not astonishing. Maybe just embarrassing.

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Religion
10:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Bishop: 'I See Marriage As A Sacred Institution'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, if you follow sports you might have sympathy - or not - for heartbroken March Madness fans whose schools have already flunked out. We're going to ask why we care so much when our brackets are broken. That conversation is in just a few minutes. But first we want to return to two important cases being argued in the Supreme Court this week.

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Movies
10:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Former NJ Governor On His 'Fall To Grace'

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 2:24 pm

In 2004, Jim McGreevey was the governor of New Jersey and a rising political star. That was until he admitted his homosexuality, and an improper relationship with a male staff member. What happened next is the subject of the new HBO documentary, Fall To Grace. Host Michel Martin speaks with McGreevy and filmmaker Alexandra Pelosi.

The Two-Way
10:24 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Residents Wait To Return Home After Landslide On Puget Sound Island

Houses sit near the edge of a landslide on Whidbey Island on Wednesday.
Ted S. Warren Associated Press

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 2:05 pm

Residents forced from their homes on Puget Sound's scenic Whidbey Island in Washington State are waiting for a green light from geologists and engineers after a large landslide knocked a house off its foundation and threatened to damage several others.

The landslide on the island, about 50 miles north of Seattle, measured about a quarter-mile wide and a half-mile deep, according to NBC News.

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The Two-Way
10:24 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Powerball Winner Owes Thousands In Child Support Payments

Powerball winner Pedro Quezada holds up a promotional check featuring his $338 million jackpot. He owes $29,000 in back child support payments, according to New Jersey law enforcement authorities.
Julio Cortez AP

Now he can catch up with his bills. Pedro Quezada of New Jersey claimed the fourth-largest jackpot in the history of the Powerball multistate lottery on Tuesday. Instead of taking the $338 million dollar prize in installments, he opted for a one-time lump sum payment of $211 million, which is the third-largest single cash prize the lottery has ever awarded.

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The Two-Way
10:06 am
Thu March 28, 2013

'Arsenal' Found At Newtown Shooter's Home; Read The Police Reports

Dec. 18, 2012: Crime scene tape stretches across the property outside the home where Adam Lanza lived with his mother, Nancy Lanza. Inside, police found weapons and other evidence.
Lucas Jackson Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 12:57 pm

Police found hundreds of rounds of ammunition, guns, three photos of "what appears to be a deceased human covered with plastic" and other evidence when they searched the Newtown, Conn., home of killer Adam Lanza, according to records released Thursday.

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The Two-Way
9:39 am
Thu March 28, 2013

UPDATED: N. Korea Responds To U.S. Bomber Training Run Over Korean Peninsula

A U.S. Air Force B-2 stealth bomber flies near Osan U.S. Air Base in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, on Thursday.
Shin Young-keun AP

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 7:00 pm

The U.S. military is making no secret about a training flight by a pair of nuclear-capable B-2 stealth bombers from a base in the American Midwest to the Korean Peninsula — what's being described as an "extended deterrence mission."

The flight of the two radar-evading bombers "demonstrates the United States' ability to conduct long range, precision strikes quickly and at will," the United States Forces Korea said in a press release Thursday.

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Shots - Health News
9:25 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Why More Patients Should Blog About Illness And Death

David Oliver sits quietly as he waits for the results of a scan at Ellis Fischel Cancer Center in Columbia, Mo., in 2012. The University of Missouri research professor was diagnosed with cancer in September 2011. He broke the news to colleagues via a video on the Internet.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 2:51 pm

I entered the world of illness blogs for the first time when I learned through Facebook that a friend from middle school passed away last Friday from acute myeloid leukemia. In the three months between his diagnosis and his death, the friend, whom I'll call Tom, blogged beautifully and intimately on CaringBridge, a Web tool designed to help the seriously ill tell their stories and manage communication with friends and family.

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Music Interviews
9:21 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Emmylou Harris And Rodney Crowell: Harmonizing To That 'Old Yellow Moon'

Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell have been friends and collaborators since the 1970s. Their new album together is called Old Yellow Moon.
David McClister Nonesuch Records

Emmylou Harris' first solo album, "Pieces of the Sky," was released in 1975 after the death of her singing partner, Gram Parsons. The opening track on the album is a song called "Bluebird Wine," by a then-unknown songwriter named Rodney Crowell. She recorded two more of his songs on her next album, got him to join her band in the mid-'70s and now, after an almost 40-year friendship, the two musicians have recorded an album together called Old Yellow Moon. The two talk with Terry Gross about their long, enduring careers, their friendship, their influences and singing harmony.

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The Two-Way
8:41 am
Thu March 28, 2013

'Historic' Web Attack Didn't Cripple The Internet And Is Over Anyway

Huge amounts of data were flying, but the attack didn't cause major problems around the world, Internet monitors say.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 10:49 am

There's much angst over the cyberattack that we and others reported about Wednesday — a denial-of-service broadside allegedly aimed at an anti-spam group by a Dutch hosting company, Cyberbunker. It led to reports about, supposedly, major congestion on the Web.

Well, there are two things everyone needs to know this morning:

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The Two-Way
7:54 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Slow But Better Than Thought: 4th Quarter GDP Revised Up Again

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 9:22 am

The U.S. economy grew at a 0.4 percent annual rate in fourth-quarter 2012, the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported Thursday morning.

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Monkey See
7:37 am
Thu March 28, 2013

The Good News Is That We Know 'Idol' Is Really Live Now

Michael Becker Fox

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 9:56 am

Last night on American Idol was Motown Night, when we all learned that Motown songs (like "I Heard It Through The Grapevine") should all be sung as seriously as possible, wearing a scowl, with all the fun sucked out. (And that was a performance that was pretty good.) It's in keeping with this season, in which melodramatic ballads have dominated even more than usual.

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The Two-Way
7:23 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Snap! Miami Heat's Streak Ends At 27

Miami Heat superstar LeBron James during Wednesday night's loss to the Chicago Bulls, which snapped the Heat's 27-game winning streak.
Brian Kersey UPI /Landov

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 8:40 am

In the end, the Heat couldn't take it.

LeBron James and his Miami teammates saw their win streak end at 27 games when they got gored in Chicago on Wednesday night — losing to the Bulls by a score of 101-97.

So the Los Angeles Lakers' 33-game run, set during the 1971-72 season, still stands as the NBA record.

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