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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Stars In His Eyes, Sending Smoke Signals To Mars

ESA Getty Images

In his slim but beguiling novel Equilateral, Ken Kalfus places us inside the heads of his characters with such deftness that the line between what is true and what they believe to be true fades to obscurity. It's no coincidence that the heads in question belong to scientists who pride themselves on their evidence-based worldview; Kalfus delights in having readers continually gauge and recalibrate the distance between the world and his characters' seemingly objective observations of it.

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The Two-Way
5:33 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Boston Marathon Explosions: Latest Developments

A marathon runner, wrapped in a blanket to stay warm after the race, watched Monday as authorities investigated the bombings that shook the finish line area at the Boston Marathon. At least three people were killed and dozens were wounded.
Nicolaus Czarnecki Barcroft Media /Landov

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 5:59 am

The day after two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, investigators began to unravel some of the details of what happened, and we began to learn about the lives of the three people who were killed.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers said that they believed the devices used in the attack may have been pressure-cooker bombs stuffed with BBs and nails. Investigators said the bombs may have been left inside nylon bags or backpacks.

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Politics
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

GOP Wants Immigration Bill To Address Border Security

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A bipartisan immigration bill in the U.S. Senate contains a prerequisite. Before millions of people in the U.S. without documents have a chance at visas and eventual citizenship, the borders must be secured. So what qualifies as secure?

Here's NPR's David Welna.

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Business
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with gold losing some of its glitter.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The explosions in Boston and a report showing China's economy to be slowing caused upheaval in many markets yesterday. But gold took the spotlight when its price dropped by more than 9 percent by the end of trading. This is the sharpest daily decline in the gold price in 30 years. Analysts say it suggests investors are losing faith in the precious metal as a safe haven.

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Business
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is Pulitzer - or Pulitzer, as they used to pronounce it when I was growing up in Indiana.

Yesterday, the Pulitzer Prize winners were announced. The New York Times led the way, taking four awards for its reporting.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And in the arts category, this year marked the return of the prize for fiction. No winner was chosen in 2012. This year, Adam Johnson took the fiction prize for his book, "The Orphan Master's Son."

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Business
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Bankruptcy Affects More Than Patriot Coal's Retired Miners

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Retired miners are converging on St. Louis Tuesday for a union rally to protest a proposed cut in health benefits. Patriot Coal is in bankruptcy and has asked a federal judge to allow it to shed most of the health coverage for nearly 10,000 retired miners. But most of those miners never worked a day for Patriot.

Around the Nation
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Authorities Comb Evidence For Clues In Boston Blasts

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Steve Inskeep talks to Juan Zarate, former deputy national security adviser for combating terrorism, about what investigators are looking for the day after the explosions at the Boston Marathon.

Around the Nation
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Store Manager Was Close To Blasts In Boston

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I'm David Greene.

Let's work through what we know about yesterday's explosions at the Boston Marathon.

INSKEEP: Hours of struggle and accomplishment changed in an instant. Mirabelle Garcia had just finished running her ninth Boston Marathon.

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Around the Nation
4:29 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Deadly Blasts Punctuate Boston Marathon's Finish Line

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

The lead agency in yesterday's Boston Marathon explosions is the FBI. Federal investigators say this morning they are doing all they can to get answers, but there is still much they do not know.

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The Two-Way
3:28 am
Tue April 16, 2013

NPR.org Hacked; 'Syrian Electronic Army' Takes Credit

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 11:30 am

The Two-Way, NPR.org and some of NPR's Twitter accounts were hacked late Monday by an organization that's said to support Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime, as this statement from NPR reports:

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Planet Money
2:55 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Most People Are Supposed To Pay This Tax. Almost Nobody Actually Pays It.

Amazon doesn't charge sales tax in most states — but you may still be on the hook to pay the tax.
Scott Sady AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:17 pm

The majority of Americans have now filed their taxes. And the majority of Americans have done so incorrectly.

There is one mistake, in particular, that lots of people made: They bought tax-free things online or in another state — and they failed to pay tax on their purchase in their home state.

It's called a use tax. As far as I can tell, accountants and tax lawyers are some of the only people who pay it.

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Author Interviews
2:53 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Is The United States A 'Dispensable Nation'?

Michael Krinke iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

In The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy In Retreat, former State Department adviser Vali Nasr describes veteran diplomat Richard Holbrooke being all but frozen out by President Obama's inner circle, for whom Nasr believes diplomacy was a "lost art."

Instead of engaging civilians to find political solutions in Afghanistan and beyond, they would look first to the military and intelligence agencies for solutions that were politically popular — that includes getting U.S. troops out of Afghanistan.

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Law
2:52 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Adoption Case Brings Rare Family Law Dispute To High Court

This October 2011 photo provided by Melanie Capobianco shows her adoptive daughter, Veronica, trick-or-treating in Charleston, S.C. The child has been the focus of a custody battle between her adoptive parents and her birth father.
Courtesy of Melanie Capobianco AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Take the usual agony of an adoption dispute. Add in the disgraceful U.S. history of ripping Indian children from their Native American families. Mix in a dose of initial fatherly abandonment. And there you have it — a poisonous and painful legal cocktail that goes before the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday.

At issue is the reach of the Indian Child Welfare Act, known as ICWA. The law was enacted in 1978 to protect Native American tribes from having their children almost literally stolen away and given to non-Indian adoptive or foster parents.

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Books
2:51 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Diverse List Of Future British Literary Stars In Latest 'Granta'

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 9:31 am

Literary magazine Granta has just released its latest Best of Young British Novelists issue. It's a hefty volume that comes out only once a decade, so making the cut is a major feat, putting its chosen in the company of modern literary legends like Salman Rushdie and David Mitchell.

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Europe
2:50 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Letters Of Heartbreak Find Some Love In Verona, Italy

The Juliet Club (Club di Giulietta) mailbox in Verona, Italy. Volunteers answer by hand every single letter that the club receives.
Courtesy of the Juliet Club

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:55 pm

Each year, the town of Verona, Italy — home of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet — receives thousands of letters of heartache and unrequited love addressed to the play's star-crossed heroine.

The tradition of sending letters to Juliet very likely goes back centuries. People started by leaving notes on a local landmark said to be Juliet's tomb. Later, many started sending mail directly to the city. By the 1990s, Verona was receiving so many letters, it created an office to deal with it. And each letter — the Juliet Club office gets more than 6,000 a year — is answered by hand.

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