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Science & Health
3:56 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Anti-Drug PSAs: Do They Work?

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:38 pm

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Arts & Life
3:56 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

New Cuban Sounds Rooted In Tradition From 'Global Village'

The Miami group Tiempo Libre combines hip-hop, R&B, rock and pan-Latin sounds to create a distinctive version of Cuban party music known as timba.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:38 pm

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Science
3:56 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

The Sounds of Thirsty Trees

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:38 pm

A team of physicists at Grenoble University in France discovered that trees make different sounds when they are starved for water versus when they are simply thirsty. We hear from Dr. Alexandre Ponomarenko, the lead researcher, and hear a bit of the thirsty tree sounds.

History
3:21 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

First He Invented The Phone. Then, Bell Left A Voice Message

Though the quality of the sound recordings is poor, we know what Alexander Graham Bell was saying because he left transcripts.
Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 3:28 pm

As the inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell is credited with bringing countless voices to our ears. And now, for the first time, here he is imploring us to hear his own voice:

The sound is scratchy. You have to strain to decipher it, but the words are clear. They're from Bell's lips, recorded in 1885 but unveiled just last week by the Smithsonian.

"It lets us know what the past was really like. It fills in a gap for people," says Shari Stout, collections manager at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

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Arts & Life
2:36 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Japan Marks 'Restoration Of Sovereignty' For The First Time

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe delivers a speech Sunday in Tokyo as Emperor Akihito, third from right, and Empress Michiko, second from right, listen during a ceremony marking the day Japan recovered its sovereignty under the San Francisco Peace treaty in 1952.
Itsuo Inouye AP

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 5:06 am

Japan marked for the first time Sunday the end of the allied occupation of the country following its defeat in World War II.

"We have a responsibility to make Japan a strong and resolute country that others across the world can rely on," Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said at a ceremony in Tokyo that was attended by dignitaries, including Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko.

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The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Obama And O'Brien Take Jabs At Politics And Media (Highlights)

President Obama joked at the White House Correspondents' Dinner that he had experimented with bangs to liven up his second term, stealing a fashion tip from the first lady, Michelle Obama.
CSPAN

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Arts & Life
1:26 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Iraq Pulls 10 Broadcasters' Licenses Over Sectarian Violence

Iraqi officials have suspended the right of 10 satellite TV channels to operate in the country, as media regulators say the stations' coverage of sectarian conflicts incites more violence.

"Most of the channels, including local stations such as 'Baghdad' and 'al-Sharqiya,' are pro-Sunni and often critical of the Shi'ite-led government," Reuters reports. "Al Jazeera is based in Qatar, a Sunni-ruled kingdom."

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Arts & Life
12:56 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Deadly Bangladesh Collapse: Building Owner Arrested

Sohel Rana, the fugitive owner of an illegally constructed building that collapsed last week in Bangladesh, killing some 377 people, is paraded by Rapid Action Battalion commandoes for the media in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Sunday.
Palash Khan AP

Bangladeshi authorities arrested Sunday the owner of the building that collapsed last week outside the capital, Dhaka, killing more than 300 people.

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Arts & Life
8:24 am
Sun April 28, 2013

For Afghan Policewomen, Danger Often Comes From Colleagues

Afghan policewomen take part in a training exercise in the western province of Herat in 2011. Policewomen face frequent sexual harassment and assaults, often carried out by policemen, human rights groups say.
Sardar Xinhua/Landov

It seems almost trivial at first: the latest Human Rights Watch report on Afghanistan says female police officers need their own toilets. Sure, who's going to argue with that. But why is it a big deal?

Here's how it unfolds.

Female police officers are experiencing high levels of harassment, sexual assault and rape — often at the hands of their male colleagues. Where is most of this activity taking place? In police station bathrooms and changing rooms.

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Arts & Life
8:04 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Tamerlan Tsarnaev Spoke Of Jihad With Mother, Reports Say

Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, center, mother of Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar, reportedly spoke of radical ideas with her eldest son in 2011. Anzor Tsarnaeva, the boys' father, is on the left. At right is the boys' aunt, Patimat Suleymanova.
Getty Images Getty Images

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev "vaguely discussed" jihad during a 2011 phone conversation with his mother, according to a U.S. official who described the recording to the Associated Press. The call, taped by a Russian government agency, reportedly did not include any mention of a plot inside the U.S.

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Politics
6:09 am
Sun April 28, 2013

The Ins And Outs Of Obama's Social Security Plan

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Poetry
6:09 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Dilruba Ahmed: An Outsider Turns To Poetry

promo image

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:40 pm

April is National Poetry Month, and to celebrate, Weekend Edition is talking with younger poets about why they chose to write poetry and why it's still important in our everyday lives. This week, we spoke to Bangladeshi-American poet Dilruba Ahmed.

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Three Books...
6:03 am
Sun April 28, 2013

What's Cooking? 3 Books That Are More Filling Than Food

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 2:41 pm

Foodie fiction has become a veritable genre, devoted to deliciousness, to making your mouth water, to making you feel suddenly, irrevocably starved — and to making everything, sprouts and bologna included, an aphrodisiac. But what happens when enough is enough? Or when, perhaps, you're on a diet, or a deserted island, or attempting celibacy, or learning to live without gluten? What happens when you're hungry for the kind of fiction that concerns food but isn't in love with food — and thereby won't make you hungry, or lustful, or both?

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Science
5:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

From Coast To Coast with The Power Of The Sun

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Arts & Life
5:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

N. Korean Refugees Tell Tales of Ordinary, Desperate Lives

Courtesy of Sokeel Park

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:40 pm

Sokeel Park sees the effects of North Korea's repressive government every day. He lives in South Korea, but works for an NGO named Liberty in North Korea. His job is to debrief those who've managed to leave the North and help them start new lives in the South.

Park says that with so much focus on the country's nuclear weapons and leadership, it's easy to forget about the 24 million people going about their everyday lives. Those lives are heavily controlled by the North Korean government, citizens are told where to work, where to live, and are not allowed to leave.

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