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The Two-Way
10:43 am
Sat May 11, 2013

In Cleveland, 30 Minutes Of Bravery Ended 10-Year Nightmare

It took neighbors' help for Amanda Berry to escape through the bolted storm door of the Cleveland home where authorities say she and two other women were held captive for nearly a decade. After she emerged, the women and Berry's daughter were rescued.
David Maxwell EPA /LANDOV

Until today, there's been a rush of news related to the kidnapping of three young women in Cleveland, their rescue after a decade in captivity and the chilling details that have emerged about what they went through. Now, the news has slowed. We suspect there will be less to report in coming days, but we'll watch for important developments.

There is a story to recommend, though:

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The Two-Way
9:49 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Emotions Run High After Boston Bombing Suspect's Burial

Some of the graves at the Al-Barzakh Islamic Cemetery in Doswell, Va., where the body of Boston Marathon bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev has been buried. His grave was not identified to journalists.
Yuri Gripas Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 12:04 pm

The news that Boston Marathon bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev has been buried in a rural cemetery just north of Richmond, Va., is causing controversy there.

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Pakistanis 'Defy Violence' To Vote In Landmark Election

Pakistani men lined up to vote in Rawalpindi on Saturday. Men and women cast ballots separately as millions went to the poll.
T. Mughal EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 10:17 pm

Despite attacks in the days and weeks leading up to Saturday's voting — and deadly bombings and other attacks on the very day they're going to the polls — Pakistanis are showing they're willing to "defy the violence," NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from Lahore.

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The Two-Way
8:22 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Schools? How About A Science Laureate At The Super Bowl?

Beyonce took the stage at this year's Super Bowl halftime show. Imagine a scientist instead. Perhaps dressed differently.
Michael DeMocker The Times-Picayune /Landov

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 9:11 am

The same scientist who famously "killed Pluto" (as a planet, that is) says it's "brilliant" that there's an effort underway in Congress to name a science laureate.

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Fresh Air Weekend
8:03 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Messud, Volk And Scorsese

Animated as ever when it comes to the topic of film, director Martin Scorsese delivers the 2013 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities at the Kennedy Center on April 1.
NIcholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 10:12 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Simon Says
7:54 am
Sat May 11, 2013

The X-ray Vision Of Mothers

Mothers somehow know when we've been bad, but when times are tough, they also have our back.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 1:10 pm

Mothers have eyes in the back of their heads. They may not show up on X-rays, but they're there.

Like a lot of youngsters, I used to get my mother to turn her head so I could search through her hair for the eyeballs she claimed to have back there, telling her, "No you don't! No you don't!" But when I'd scamper off to another part of the apartment and pick up an ashtray or fiddle with the window blinds, I'd hear my mother's voice ring out, "I can see you! I know what you're up to!"

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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Astronauts Go On Spacewalk To Fix Ammonia Leak

NASA.gov

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 4:11 pm

Two astronauts went on a last-minute spacewalk Saturday to replace a pump suspected of being the source of a serious ammonia leak.

It was unclear what caused the ammonia leak, NASA spokesman Rob Navias said, "but the installation of this spare pump package — at least at the moment — seems to have done the trick."

NASA officials called the spacewalk a success, but said it would take time to see if the leak was indeed stopped. Engineers will review photos the astronauts took at the site.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Officials Aren't Linking Man's Arrest To Texas Explosion

April 25, in Waco: Friends, family members and fellow firefighters held a memorial for the first responders killed by the April 17 explosion at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas.
Jerry Larson/pool EPA /LANDOV

Saturday's reports about the arrest of a former emergency services volunteer in the town of West, Texas, indicate the story has not moved much from where we left things on Friday:

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The Two-Way
6:17 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Genocide Conviction In Guatemala Is 'Huge Breakthrough'

Former Guatemalan dictator Efrain Rios Montt during his trial earlier this week.
Jorge Dan Lopez Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 1:04 pm

Former Guatemalan dictator Efrain Rios Montt was convicted of genocide by a court in his country Friday for the part he played in massacres and other crimes committed against Mayans while he ruled in 1982 and 1983.

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The Two-Way
5:40 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Top Stories: Cleveland Kidnapping; Benghazi Emails

In Cleveland earlier this week, friends and family gathered balloons and other things to have on hand to welcome home kidnapping victim Michelle Knight.
Thomas Ondrey The Plain Dealer /Landov

Good morning.

As the day gets going, the top stories include:

-- Cleveland Kidnap Victim Michelle Knight Released From Hospital; Thanks Community, Asks For Privacy. (Plain Dealer)

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Krulwich Wonders...
5:02 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Astronomy's Little Secret: The Hidden Art Of 'Moonsweeping'

La Luna

A few nights ago, (Wednesday, I think, around midnight), I was by my window looking up, and there, hanging in the sky, I saw the moon. Not all of it, just what the almanac used to call "a crescent" — what my mom called a "toenail moon." The whole moon, I knew, was up there, hidden in shadow. The crescent part was facing the sun. That's the part you can see at the beginning of each month, my second grade teacher, Mrs. Elkins taught us, using a flashlight and a tennis ball to demonstrate the phases of the moon. Scotty Miller, I remember, got to hold the tennis ball. Mrs.

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The Salt
4:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Tiny Mites Spark Big Battle Over Imports Of French Cheese

Microscopic bugs called cheese mites are responsible for giving Mimolette its distinctive rind and flavor.
Chris Waits via Flickr

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 2:28 pm

The Food and Drug Administration is currently embroiled in a surprisingly heated culinary standoff — pitting French cheese-makers (and American cheese-lovers) against regulators, all because of one very small problem: cheese mites.

Cheese mites are microscopic little bugs that live on the surfaces of aged cheeses, munching the microscopic molds that grow there. For many aged cheeses, they're something of an industry nuisance, gently brushed off the cheeses. But for Mimolette, a bright orange French cheese, they're actually encouraged.

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The Sequester: Cuts And Consequences
4:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Sequester Has Air Force Clipping Its Wings

To save money, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in North Carolina is keeping some of its pilots out of the sky.
Airman 1st Class Aubrey White U.S. Air Force

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 11:58 am

The Pentagon says the automatic budget cuts known as sequestration could leave the U.S. with a military that is simply unprepared for the most challenging combat missions. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel told Congress in April that the military is eating its seed corn.

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Author Interviews
4:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

A Nigerian-'Americanah' Novel About Love, Race And Hair

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is a Nigerian-born author and MacArthur fellow. Her earlier works include the novels Purple Hibiscus and Half of a Yellow Sun and the short story collection The Thing Around Your Neck.
Ivara Esege Random House

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:22 pm

School romances face a lot of obstacles: the big decision at graduation, the competing demands of two burgeoning careers, perhaps a period spent in a long-distance relationship. But the young lovers in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's latest novel, Americanah, must overcome even more challenges than usual: military rule, immigration restrictions and, during their years apart, other relationships.

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Monkey See
4:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Christopher Guest Comes To HBO With A 'Family' Comedy That's Serious

Chris O'Dowd (left) stars in Family Tree, a new HBO show from Christopher Guest (right) and Jim Piddock.
Suzanne Tenner HBO

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 9:11 am

Christopher Guest has made so many people laugh since he started making mock documentaries with This Is Spinal Tap in 1984 that his fans might be surprised to hear his response to Scott Simon's question on Saturday's Weekend Edition about whether he ever thinks about making a serious movie.

Referencing Family Tree, his new show for HBO starring Chris O'Dowd as a man discovering his roots, Guest says that even with comedy, the emotional content can still be critical.

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