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My Guilty Pleasure
6:03 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Appetite For Destruction: A Deadly, Delicious Rock Memoir

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 7:16 am

Alex Stone is the author of Fooling Houdini.

I first saw Guns N' Roses on MTV when I was in middle school. Mary Jordan had just ended our rocky three-week relationship — by phone — and I was sulking on a friend's couch. "Check it out," he said, gesturing at the TV. "Sweet Child O' Mine" was playing. "These guys are my new favorite band." Four minutes and 12 seconds later, they were mine too.

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Arts & Life
5:44 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Making Up A History For The 'Dutch Mona Lisa'

Very little is known about Girl With a Pearl Earring, which is often referred to as the Dutch Mona Lisa.
Superstock The Art Archive

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 6:24 am

Johannes Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring is one of his most famous paintings, but very little is actually known about it. The girl herself is a mystery who has inspired both a novel and a movie speculating on her true story.

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Author Interviews
5:44 am
Sun February 3, 2013

'Fresh Off The Boat' And Serving Up Asian Culture

After stints as a lawyer, furniture salesman and stand-up comic, Eddie Huang found success as the owner of Baohaus, a Taiwanese bun shop on the Lower East Side.
Atisha Paulson Spiegel & Grau

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 8:23 am

Eddie Huang has done many things in a short period of time.

He's been a lawyer, stand-up comic, and now he's the owner of New York's Baohous restaurant and the host of his own food show on Vice TV.

The most remarkable parts of Huang's life, however, took place before all that, back when he was growing up with his Taiwanese immigrant parents and navigating the ins and outs of American culture.

It's all chronicled in his new memoir Fresh Off The Boat.

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Politics
5:44 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Week In Politics: Hagel's Rough Day

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 6:24 am

Last week, former Sen. Chuck Hagel faced a very critical confirmation hearing in his quest to become the next secretary of defense, and President Obama and a bipartisan group of senators made the pitch for immigration reform. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Mara Liasson about the week in politics.

Science & Health
4:42 am
Sun February 3, 2013

In China, A Breath Of Fresh Air (In A Can)

Chinese businessman Chen Guangbiao (center) gives cans of fresh air produced by his factory to passersby for free in a financial district in Beijing.
Mark Wong EPA /LANDOV

In response to the growing concern over China's air pollution, a theatrical Chinese entrepreneur is selling cans of fresh air.

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Arts & Life
4:28 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Super Bowl Cheat Sheet: Key Phrases To Keep You In The Game

San Francisco 49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh (right) and his brother, Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh, with the Vince Lombardi Trophy on Friday.
Jim Young Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 7:22 am

Sure, you can go to a Super Bowl party and be That Guy. The one who gleefully lectures the crowd on the merits of running the inverted veer out of the pistol in order to freeze the weak-side backer.

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Arts & Life
4:21 am
Sun February 3, 2013

From A Land Where Music Was Banned — To Carnegie Hall

Afghanistan's youth orchestra performs in Kabul on Jan. 31. The orchestra is coming to the U.S. and will appear at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.
Shah Marai AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 2:49 pm

In Afghanistan, there was no sound of music when the Taliban ruled from 1996 to 2001. The Islamist militants destroyed music CDs and instruments and even jailed musicians.

Today, there are music schools and young Afghans playing in public. And, this weekend, 48 Afghan boys and girls are traveling to the U.S. to perform at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.

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Politics & Government
4:11 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Panetta: 'My Mission Has Always Been To Keep The Country Safe'

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta arrives in London on Jan. 17. Panetta is stepping down as defense secretary as soon as the Senate confirms his successor.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 2:49 pm

For more than 40 years, Leon Panetta has split his life on two coasts: his home in California and his work in Washington, D.C. It's a career that included 16 years in Congress, stints as White House chief of staff for President Clinton, and as the head of the CIA and the Pentagon under President Obama.

As Panetta prepares to leave his job as defense secretary, he sat down with Rachel Martin, host of Weekend Edition Sunday, to talk about his years in Washington and serving in the Obama administration.

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Sunday Puzzle
3:27 am
Sun February 3, 2013

Tackle 'Yards' To Make A Touchdown

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 6:24 am

On-air challenge: In recognition of the Super Bowl, the key word is "yards." You will be given some categories. For each one, name something in the category beginning with each of the letters Y, A, R, D and S. For example, if the category were "Girls' Names," you might say Yvonne, Alice, Rachel, Donna and Sally.

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Politics
3:49 pm
Sat February 2, 2013

Week In News: Hagel In The Hot Seat

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 5:41 pm

Host Laura Sullivan talks with The Atlantic's James Fallows about the news this week Chuck Hagel's confirmation hearing, the Chinese cyber-attack of The New York Times, and that newspaper's obituary of former New York City Mayor Ed Koch.

Science & Health
3:49 pm
Sat February 2, 2013

FDA Challenges Stem Cell Companies As Patients Run Out Of Time

Scientists have seen promise in the potential of stem cells, but not everyone agrees stem cell replacement therapy is ready for prime time.
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 9:30 am

Americans seeking stem cell replacement therapy hope the process can heal them of myriad diseases, and a 2011 report by the Baker Institute estimated the industry could bring in $16 billion in revenue by 2020.

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Arts & Life
3:49 pm
Sat February 2, 2013

Inside The Training Room: Uncovering Football's Scars

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 5:41 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

This is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan. And if it's anything like last year, tomorrow's Super Bowl will reach more than 111 million viewers, in this country alone. And while the game ends for the fans tomorrow night, for players, the effects will likely linger on.

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Arts & Life
3:27 pm
Sat February 2, 2013

Wayne Shorter On Jazz: 'How Do You Rehearse The Unknown?'

Wayne Shorter turns 80 this year. His newest album is called Without a Net.
Robert Ascroft Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 5:41 pm

The New York Times doesn't mince words when it writes, "Wayne Shorter is generally acknowledged to be jazz's greatest living composer."

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Politics & Government
3:07 pm
Sat February 2, 2013

Turkish Left-Wing Group Claims Responsibility For U.S. Embassy Blast

Mourners gather in Ankara on Saturday by the coffin of Mustafa Akarsu, who was killed in the attack on the U.S. Embassy in Turkey's capital on Friday.
AP

A radical left-wing group is calling Friday's attack on the U.S. Embassy in Turkey "an act of self-sacrifice" against the U.S. The suicide bombing killed an embassy guard and injured several others.

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Author Interviews
1:36 pm
Sat February 2, 2013

The Inconvenient Truth About Polar Bears

A polar bear looks up as the sound of the camera catches his ear on the edge of the Hudson Bay, outside Churchill, Manitoba, Canada.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 5:41 pm

In 2008, reports of polar bears' inevitable march toward extinction gripped headlines. Stories of thinning Arctic ice and even polar bear cannibalism combined to make these predators into a powerful symbol in the debate about climate change.

The headlines caught Zac Unger's attention, and he decided to write a book about the bears.

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