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Shots - Health News
12:07 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

That Employee Who Smokes Costs The Boss $5,800 A Year

A man smokes outside an office building in New York City in April. Smoking breaks cost employers almost $3,000 per year per smoking employees, a study says.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 7:42 am

Smoking is expensive, and not just for the person buying the cigs. Employers are taking hard looks at the cost of employing smokers as they try to cut health insurance costs, with some refusing to hire people who say they smoke.

But figures on the cost of smoking have been rough estimates at best, with a very general estimate of $193 billion a year nationwide.

Researchers now say they're got much tighter focus on the number: $5,800 per smoker per year.

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The Salt
11:53 am
Tue June 4, 2013

In Philly, Lo Mein Is Going Low Sodium

Philadelphia is training owners of Chinese takeout restaurants to cut some of the salt in menu items like lo mein.
Stephen Flood Express-Times/Landov

Philadelphia is training owners of Chinese takeout restaurants to cut some of the salt in their menu items.

The city is working with about 200 takeout restaurants, providing free cooking lessons and tips on adding flavor without salt. None of the restaurant owners were paid to participate in the program, which offers advice such as how to find suppliers who sell low-sodium ingredients at a reasonable price. Participants are also encouraged to limit the number of soy sauce packets they hand to customers.

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Parallels
11:44 am
Tue June 4, 2013

In Gaza, Hamas Targets Palestinian Informants In Crackdown

Palestinian gunmen drag a man from a motorcycle in Gaza City on Nov. 20. He was one of six men killed that day on suspicion of collaborating with Israel. The Hamas government in the Gaza Strip denied responsibility, though it has executed others judged to be working with Israel's security forces.
Hatem Moussa AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 10:25 am

Life was already grim in the Gaza Strip when fighting raged between Israel and Hamas last November. Then Khulud Badawi got unexpected bad news about her husband.

"I was at home when my son came in and said, 'Mom, they killed Dad.' I said, 'Who?' He said, 'Hamas.' I asked him, 'Where?' He said, 'Next to the gas station,'" she recalls.

Badawi's husband, Ribhi Badawi, was in prison in Gaza City. He was supposed to go to court that day for a final appeal of charges that he had collaborated with Israel against Hamas, which runs the Gaza Strip.

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The Two-Way
11:22 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Rubber Ducky, You're (Not) The One. Hong Kong Quacker Spawns Others

The original inflatable duck by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman floats in Hong Kong's Victoria Harbour.
Li Peng Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 2:39 pm

Perhaps it was inevitable. Given the huge popularity of the six-story, yellow rubber ducky that's been bobbing around in Hong Kong's Victoria Harbour, companies in a number of mainland Chinese cities have decided to copy it.

New ducks have popped up in the central city of Wuhan, the ancient city of Xi'an, the northern port city of Tianjin and Hengdian, a town in Zhejiang province that is home to a massive movie studio.

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The Two-Way
11:17 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Judge Accepts James Holmes' Insanity Plea In Colo. Shootings

James Holmes in a photo from the Arapahoe County (Colo.) Sheriff's Office.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 12:14 pm

The judge presiding over the case of James Holmes, who is accused of a mass shooting at a Colorado movie theater, has accepted a not guilty plea by reason of insanity.

This sets the table for a potentially lengthy mental examination of Holmes. The AP reports:

"The next step is an evaluation of Holmes by state doctors to determine whether he was insane at the time of the shootings. That could take months.

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The Two-Way
10:49 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Jill Kelley Files Suit Against Feds Over Petraeus Scandal

Jill Kelley, outside her home in Tampa.
Brian Blanco Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 12:13 pm

Jill Kelley, the Florida socialite whose complaints to the FBI sparked the discovery of an extramarital affair that led to the resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus, has filed a lawsuit against the federal government.

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Law
10:36 am
Tue June 4, 2013

What's At Stake With Supreme Court Decisions?

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 12:48 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program we are going to dig into a new survey of African-American attitudes about their lives, and some of the findings may surprise you. We'll also talk about how that 401(k) retirement plan, once a fresh idea, may need some new thinking.

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Money Coach
10:36 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Why Your Boss Should Update Your 401(k) Plan

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 12:48 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we'll talk about a new poll about attitudes of African-Americans about issues like work, health, and relationships. It turns a lot of what you've been hearing in popular media on its head, so we hope you'll stick around for that conversation.

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Race
10:36 am
Tue June 4, 2013

What Do We Know About 'African American Lives Today?'

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 12:48 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Race
10:36 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Discussing The African-American Experience

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 12:48 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Race
10:36 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Money To Matrimony: Talking About The Black Experience

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 12:48 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We want to continue the conversation we just started about the new poll, African-American Lives Today. It is a survey conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which is one of NPR's funders, and the Harvard School of Public Health. For a closer look at the survey itself, you can check it out on the Code Switch page of NPR.org. And we shared the poll with some guests on the program who've been thinking about or writing about a lot of the issues touched on by the poll.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Tue June 4, 2013

At IRS Hearing: Talk Of 'Jackboot Of Tyranny'

Karen Kenny of San Fernando Valley [Calif.] Patriots at Tuesday's House Ways and Means Committee hearing in Washington, D.C.
Yuri Gripas Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 12:09 pm

We now have faces and emotional words to attach to the scandal surrounding the Internal Revenue Service and its targeting of conservative "tea party" and "patriot" groups during the 2012 campaign cycle.

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The Salt
9:50 am
Tue June 4, 2013

The French Learned To Make Wine From Italians 2,400 Years Ago

This French tapestry depicts noblemen and women treading and pressing grapes to make wine circa 1500. By then, the French had already been making wine for at least 2,000 years.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 11:38 am

The French weren't the first to make wine? Mon dieu! But as anyone who has sipped a Bordeaux, Champagne or Burgundy can tell you, the French got pretty good at it once they learned how. And thanks to some molecular archaeology, researchers can now confirm they picked up these skills as early as 425 B.C.

So who taught the French the art of viniculture? Probably the ancient Italians, says the man with perhaps the coolest nickname in science research — the "Indiana Jones of alcohol," Patrick McGovern.

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The Two-Way
9:34 am
Tue June 4, 2013

16 Americans Among Nonprofit Workers Convicted In Egypt

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 1:42 am

Sixteen Americans were among 43 people convicted in Egypt on Tuesday for what the transitional government at the time had said was illegal interference in the nation's affairs. The investigation began in 2011 under military rule.

Those judged guilty all worked for foreign non-governmental organizations, including two U.S. groups that have tried to promote democracy in Egypt.

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Tue June 4, 2013

AP: Top Obama Officials Use Secret Email Accounts

U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius speaks during a news conference at the Department of the Treasury on May 31 in Washington, DC.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 11:39 am

After months of wrangling with government agencies over Freedom of Information Act requests, The Associated Press has an interesting bit of news today: Some of Obama's most important appointees use non-public email addresses to conduct official business.

The AP calls those email addresses "secret," and they are different from the frowned-upon practice of using personal email addresses to conduct business. These email addresses are set up by the government and intended for official use.

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