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8:52 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Census Shows Continued Change In America's Racial Makeup

Thursday's data comes from a set of annual population estimates released by the Census Bureau.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 1:21 pm

Asian-Americans were the fastest-growing racial or ethnic group in America, now comprising almost 19 million people, according to data released Thursday by the Census Bureau.

And the state with the fastest-growing Asian population? South Dakota. Home to Mount Rushmore, Laura Ingalls Wilder's "Little Town on the Prairie," and now Kharka Khapangi — a Bhutanese refugee who moved from the state of Washington to Sioux Falls, S.D., in 2011.

"It's easy to find a job here in South Dakota, so people from other states, they are also moving here," Khapangi said.

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Monkey See
8:51 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Let's Rush To Judgment: 'The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug'

Sir Ian McKellen in The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug.
Warner Brothers Pictures

Well, here it is: the trailer for the next Hobbit movie in the series of three Hobbit movies that will be made out of a single medium-length book.

The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug doesn't come out until December, but you can already delve into the dragons and mountains and birds (oh my).

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Now He Tells Us: 'Tang Sucks,' Says Apollo 11's Buzz Aldrin

Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, during the Apollo 11 mission to the moon.
Neil Armstrong/NASA Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 10:02 am

Hey, we were told in the '60s that we'd grow up to be astronauts if we drank Tang and that our heroes loved it!

But the second man on the moon — Apollo 11's Buzz Aldrin — says "Tang sucks."

TMZ.com broke the news that Aldrin let loose with his real opinion during taping of Spike TV's Guys Choice awards, which airs Thursday at 9 p.m. ET.

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Books News & Features
8:39 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Amid Dropping Test Scores, Teen Writers' Creativity Soars

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 9:58 am

NPR correspondent Joseph Shapiro and his daughter Eva spent the weekend at the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Eva, 15, won the "Best in Grade" award, one of two for ninth-grade writers, for a short story. She takes writing classes with Writopia Lab in Washington, D.C.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Colorado Fires: Two Deaths Reported; 5 Percent Containment

The Black Forest wildfire is burning near Colorado Springs, Colo. As Thursday dawned it was "zero percent contained," authorities said.
Chris Schneider Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 6:31 pm

Update at 7:15 p.m. ET. Two Deaths Reported:

The El Paso County Sheriff says that two bodies were recovered Thursday in the burn area of the Black Forest fire near Colorado Springs. A "coroner investigation is ongoing," the department says.

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Thu June 13, 2013

VIDEO: Gov. Christie Slow Jammin' The News With Jimmy Fallon

Jimmy Fallon and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie during their slow jap on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon.
Theo Wargo Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 8:38 am

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Book News: Inmate Fights For His Right To Read Werewolf Erotica

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:14 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Thriller On The Ice: Blackhawks Beat Bruins In Triple OT

The thrill of victory; the agony of defeat: Andrew Shaw of the Chicago Blackhawks (right) celebrates after the game-winning goal goes in. Boston Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask looks back toward the puck that's now in his net.
Mike Wulf CSM/LANDOV

Hockey fans got nearly twice their money's worth Wednesday night as it took until deep into the third overtime period for the hometown Chicago Blackhawks to defeat the visiting Boston Bruins in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Finals.

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Around the Nation
6:09 am
Thu June 13, 2013

U.S. Navy To Make Its Communications Less 'Rude'

The Navy has been issuing orders and messages in capital letters since the 1850s when teletype machines didn't have lower case. But to young sailors, raised on texting, "all CAPS" signifies shouting.

Book Reviews
6:04 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Reader Advisory: 'Shining Girls' Is Gruesome But Gripping

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 5:18 pm

Borrow from Stephen King a house with a wormhole that somehow allows for time travel, re-create the monstrous chilliness of scenes between a serial killer and his female victims in The Silence of the Lambs, and you could easily end up with a pretty derivative thriller. But talented Cape Town writer Lauren Beukes has managed to turn such borrowing and theft into a triumph in her new novel, The Shining Girls. It's her third book, and a marvelous narrative feat that spans the history of Chicago from the 1930s to the 1990s.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
6:04 am
Thu June 13, 2013

The Complete List: What NPR's Backseat Book Club Has Read So Far

Carina Jaffe, 3; Larissa Jaffe, 9; Denali Jaffe, 10; Zahra Jaffe, 6; and their friend Christina Tonnu, 8, read The Phantom Tollbooth together in Philadelphia.
Courtesy the Jaffe Family

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 3:22 pm

Ever since we launched NPR's Backseat Book Club in 2011, our young listeners have been busy reading — classics like The Wizard of Oz, Black Beauty and The Phantom Tollbooth, and newer tales, like Diary of a Wimpy Kid and The Graveyard Book. If you know a kid age 9-14 who's looking for a great read, look no further: Here are all the books we've read so far. (And here's the list in printable form.)

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Around the Nation
6:03 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Rare 'Superman' Comic Sells For Big Bucks

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer. A rare copy of the comic book featuring Superman's first appearance sold for $175,000 this week. Considered the "Holy Grail" of comics by many collectors, it is one of about 100 copies. Published in 1938, the comic was found by David Gonzalez in the insulation of a house that he was restoring in Minnesota. The selling price is ten times what he paid for the house. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
5:26 am
Thu June 13, 2013

So Far Not So Bad As Storms Head East, But Threat Remains

Quite a show in Chicago: Lightning struck the Willis Tower (formerly the Sears Tower, at right) on Wednesday as the storm system moved through.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 7:56 am

The good news is that "a massive storm system originally forecast to affect one in five Americans from Iowa to Maryland surged Thursday toward the Mid-Atlantic after largely failing to live up to its billing in ferocity through the Upper Midwest."

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National Security
5:14 am
Thu June 13, 2013

NSA Head Tells Senate His Agency Didn't Do Anything Wrong

NSA Director Keith Alexander told a Senate panel that his agency's program did indeed protect American's privacy while gathering data on terrorist activity. Alexander told lawmakers he wants to declassify more details to reassure everyone the programs are legal and effective.

Business
5:02 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:43 am

Just three weeks ago, Japanese stocks were at a multi-year high — raising hopes for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's efforts to revitalize the world's third-largest economy. Since then, the market has dropped more than 20 percent.

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