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Movie Reviews
10:52 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Three New Films Examine What It Means When Girls Act Out

Ginger & Rosa (starring Alice Englert and Elle Fanning) was directed by Sally Potter, who is perhaps best known for her 1992 film Orlando.
Sally Potter

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 4:37 pm

In the '60s, some fervent rock groupies formed a band called the GTOs — short for "Girls Together Outrageously" — and while it didn't last, the name captures the impulse behind stories in which women chafe against the male-centric society that pulls their strings. This week you can see a girls-together-outrageously triple bill: Spring Breakers, Ginger & Rosa and Beyond the Hills.

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NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

And The Award For Best Picture Goes To....

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

More than 450 photographers submitted a shot to SciFri's Winter Nature Photo Contest, and thousands of fans helped choose a winner. Contest judge Clay Bolt discusses the winning entry, and what makes for a prize-winning shot. Plus, tips for budding nature photographers.

NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Can Just One Concussion Change the Brain?

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Suffering a single concussion may cause lasting brain damage, researchers report in the journal Radiology. Steven Flanagan, co-director of the Concussion Center at NYU Langone Medical Center, discusses the findings, and why diagnosing a concussion is so difficult.

The Two-Way
10:33 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Construction Crews May Have Found 'Black Plague' Victims In Britain

Archaeologists examine skeletons thought to be from the 14th century that were discovered in an excavation belonging to British rail company, Crossrail.
Crossrail

What can you find underneath a British railroad or parking lot? These days it could be skeletons, and probably a lot of them. Last month, researchers announced the bones of a man discovered underneath a British parking lot were actually King Richard III. Today, a British rail project says some of its staff stumbled upon skeletons of people who may have died of the Black Death nearly 700 years ago, during an outbreak of bubonic plague.

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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Fri March 15, 2013

CDC Confirms 'Extremely Rare' Death From Rabies Transmitted By Transplant

A Maryland man who died two weeks ago contracted rabies "through [an] organ transplantation done more than a year ago," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Friday morning.

The CDC adds that:

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Ask Me Another
9:55 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Accidental Science

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 9:42 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Now, let's welcome back to the ASK ME ANOTHER hot seat, our VIP Jad Abumrad.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Jad, were you sweating it out backstage?

JAD ABUMRAD: Some of this stuff is abusively hard.

EISENBERG: Abusively hard. I don't think it's not...

ABUMRAD: No, no, it's fine. It's all good quizzical fun.

EISENBERG: Good quizzical fun.

ABUMRAD: Yes.

EISENBERG: You're ready.

ABUMRAD: I'm ready.

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Movie Interviews
9:35 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Paul Thomas Anderson, The Man Behind 'The Master'

most twisted father-son tales ever told."" href="/post/paul-thomas-anderson-man-behind-master-0" class="noexit lightbox">
Navy veteran Freddie (Phoenix) falls under the influence of cult leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) in Anderson's film, which critic Ella Taylor describes as "one of the most twisted father-son tales ever told."
Phil Bray The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 10:52 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 2, 2012.

For Paul Thomas Anderson, moviemaking is not just an art; it's also about time management.

"At its best, a film set is when everybody knows what's going on and everybody's working together," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "At its worst, [it's] when something's been lost in communication and an actor's not sure how many shots are left or what's going on, and the makeup department's confused."

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NPR Story
9:31 am
Fri March 15, 2013

He Blinded Me With Science

Very Important Puzzler) and host of the public radio show Radiolab." href="/post/he-blinded-me-science" class="noexit lightbox">
"I feel sort of like a vampire would feel. I want to suck the blood of science and dispose of the corpse." - Jad Abumrad, this week's V.I.P. (that's Very Important Puzzler) and host of the public radio show Radiolab.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 9:12 am

Science takes center stage this week as we play games about scientific discoveries both intentional and accidental. We'll get brainy with our Very Important Puzzler, Jad Abumrad, host of WNYC's Radiolab, as he talks about his quest to become a science vampire. Plus, we roll the dice on clues about our favorite board games and find out the premises of fake TV show adaptations, from Finding Emo to Oy! Story.

TED Radio Hour
9:28 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Are We Plugged-In, Connected, But Alone?

Sherry Turkle is concerned about how our devices are changing us, as human beings.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 7:36 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Do We Need Humans?

About Sherry Turkle's TEDTalk

As we expect more from technology, do we expect less from each other? Sherry Turkle looks at how devices and online personas are redefining human connection. She says we need to really think about the kinds of connections we want to have.

About Sherry Turkle

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
9:22 am
Fri March 15, 2013

It's All Politics, Mar. 14, 2013

Vincenzo Pinto AFP/Getty Images
  • Listen to the Roundup

The white smoke has appeared and that can mean only one thing: the new edition of the It's All Politics podcast with NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving is ready. It also means that there's no budget deal in Congress, that the annual Conservative Political Action Conference is underway and that Carl Levin has decided that 36 years in the Senate is enough.

The Two-Way
9:17 am
Fri March 15, 2013

New Pope Praises Benedict, Asks Cardinals To Evangelize

Pope Francis as he visits the papal residence at the Vatican on Thursday.
Vatican AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 11:43 am

Pope Francis, in his first audience with the cardinals since becoming head of the world's 1.2 billion Roman Catholics, praised his predecessor, Benedict XVI, and urged the evangelization of the church's message.

Francis said of Benedict, who served as pontiff for eight years before his historic resignation last month, that he "lit a flame in the depths of our hearts that will continue to burn because it is fueled by his prayers."

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Shots - Health News
9:14 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Power Shift Under Way As Middle Class Expands In Developing World

Brookings Institution

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 8:00 am

"The meek shall inherit the earth" — that seems to be the latest message from the United Nations Development Program.

Their 2013 Human Development Report chronicles the recent, rapid expansion of the middle class in the developing world. It also predicts that over the next two decades growth in the so-called "Global South" will dramatically shift economic and political power away from Europe and North America.

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TED Radio Hour
9:11 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Is The Human Hand Our Best Technology?

"Only the hand can tell where it's tender, where the patient winces." — Abraham Verghese
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:58 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Do We Need Humans?

About Abraham Verghese's TEDTalk

Modern medicine is in danger of losing a powerful, old-fashioned tool: human touch. Physician and writer Abraham Verghese describes our strange new world where patients are data points, and calls for a return to the traditional physical exam.

About Abraham Verghese

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TED Radio Hour
9:01 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Are Droids Taking Our Jobs?

Andrew McAfee speaking at TEDxBoston.
Sheryl Lanzel TED

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 1:57 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Do We Need Humans?

About Andrew McAfee's TEDTalk

Robots and algorithms can now build cars, write articles, and translate texts — all work that once required a human. So what will we humans do for work? Andrew McAfee looks at recent labor data to say: We ain't seen nothing yet.

About Andrew McAfee

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TED Radio Hour
9:01 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Will Man's Best Friend Be A Robot?

Cynthia Breazeal speaking at TEDWomen conference.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 7:36 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Do We Need Humans?

About Cynthia Breazeal's TEDTalk

Why do we use robots on Mars, but not in our living rooms? Cynthia Breazeal realized the key was training robots to interact with people. Now she builds robots that teach, learn — and play.

About Cynthia Breazeal

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