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NPR Story
9:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Scientists Seek To Take The Measure of Antimatter

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY.

Up next, another installment in the continuing quest to understand antimatter, that stuff that's supposed to be the opposite of matter. It's supposed to have been created during the Big Bang in equal amounts as normal matter, but for some reason, it's all disappeared. No one knows why - yeah, that stuff or actually that anti-stuff.

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NPR Story
9:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

To Combat Rising Seas, Why Not Raise Up The Town?

When the Great Storm of 1900 battered Galveston, Texas, the town simply lifted itself up--in some places as much as 17 feet. Could a similar approach save cities today? Randy Behm of the US Army Corps of Engineers and Dwayne Jones of the Galveston Historical Foundation talk about the costs and feasibility of raising a town, albeit with better technology than Galveston's hand-cranked jacks and mules.

NPR Story
9:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

17-Year Cicadas Primed To Emerge

This spring the massive "Brood II" batch of 17-year cicadas is expected to emerge from the ground in backyards and parks all along the Eastern U.S. The insects will mate, lay eggs, and start the cycle all over again. Cicada expert John Cooley explains the unusual biology and evolution of periodical cicadas.

NPR Story
9:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Michael Pollan: You Are What You Cook

Food writer Michael Pollan once advised "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." Now, he tells us how to cook it. In his new book Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, he takes a tour of the most time-tested cooking techniques, from southern whole-hog barbecue and slow-cooked ragus to sourdough baking and pickle making.

The Two-Way
9:44 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Murder Trial Of Alleged Neo-Nazi Has Germans On Edge

Activists in Munich protest right-wing violence last month.
Johannes Simon Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 12:07 pm

The trial in Munich of an alleged neo-Nazi woman accused as an accomplice in a string of murders of mostly ethnic Turks is, as The Associated Press writes, "forcing Germans to confront painful truths about racism and the broader treatment of immigrants in society."

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
9:38 am
Fri May 3, 2013

It's All Politics, May 2, 2013

Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images
  • Listen to the Roundup

The president celebrates the 100th day of his second term by holding a news conference in which he seems unsure as to why he held a news conference in the first place. As Obama discusses "rumors of my demise," Massachusetts voters pick Senate nominees, and South Carolina's 1st District prepares for a special — and surreal — election.

Movie Interviews
9:08 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Bradley Cooper Finds 'Silver Linings' Everywhere

Bradley Cooper was nominated for an Academy Award for his 2012 role in the film Silver Linings Playbook.
Jojo Whilden The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 11:37 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Feb. 7, 2013.

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NPR Story
9:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Unstoppable Learning

Babies and young children are "already about as smart as they could possibly be."
TED

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 4:00 pm

Why do we put so much effort in making kids think and act like us? In this hour, TED speakers explore the different ways babies and children learn — from the womb, to the playground, to the web.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

TED Radio Hour
9:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

What Do Babies Think?

James Duncan Davidson James Duncan Davidson / TED

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 8:27 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unstoppable Learning.

About Alison Gopnik's TEDTalk

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TED Radio Hour
9:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

When Does Learning Begin?

James Duncan Davidson James Duncan Davidson / TED

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 8:27 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unstoppable Learning.

About Annie Murphy Paul's TED Talk

Science writer Annie Murphy Paul talks about how fetuses in the womb begin taking cues from the outside world, from the lilt of our native language to our favorite foods.

About Annie Murphy Paul

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TED Radio Hour
9:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Can Schools Exist In The Cloud?

Sugata Mitra at the TED conference in 2013.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 4:21 pm

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unstoppable Learning.

About Sugata Mitra's TEDTalk

After years of offering children self-supervised access to the Web, Sugata Mitra says kids can teach themselves. Mitra continues the conversation from earlier this episode by arguing that self-organized classes are the future of education, and he puts forward a bold vision: to build a school in the cloud.

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TED Radio Hour
9:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

What Role Do Relationships Play In Learning?

Rita Pierson at TED Talks Education.
Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 4:18 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unstoppable Learning.

About Rita Pierson's TEDTalk

Veteran teacher Rita Pierson believes that relationships are crucial to education. She talks about how classrooms lack the kind of human connections kids need to feel inspired and to learn. Pierson gave her talk as part of the PBS Special TED Talks Education, airing May 7.

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Bangladesh Fears Exodus Of Western Retailers

Relatives react after identifying the body of a loved one who was killed in last week's building collapse in Savar, on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Munir Uz Zaman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 11:46 am

The Walt Disney Co.'s decision to end its apparel production in Bangladesh after more than 500 people died in the collapse of a garment factory complex has sparked fears of a mass exodus of Western retailers.

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The Two-Way
7:43 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Pakistani Prosecutor Investigating Bhutto Death Is Gunned Down

Pakistani police officials examine the bloodied, bullet-riddled car of slain government prosecutor Chaudhry Zulfiqar Ali after an attack by gunmen Friday in Islamabad.
Aamir Qureshi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 8:19 am

In Pakistan, police say two unidentified gunmen fatally shot the special prosecutor investigating the assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto.

Friday's attack on Chaudhry Zulfiqar Ali in Islamabad deepens the mystery surrounding one of the country's most politically charged cases, which remains open six years later.

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The Two-Way
7:42 am
Fri May 3, 2013

165,000 Jobs Added In April, Jobless Rate Fell To 7.5 Percent

Waiting for work: Job seekers lined up last month at the 25th Annual CUNY big Apple Job and Internship Fair in Manhattan.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 9:05 am

(Most recent update: 10 a.m. ET.)

The nation's jobless rate edged down to 7.5 percent in April from 7.6 percent in March and employers added 165,000 jobs to their payrolls last month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday morning.

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