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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

What Did 'Prisoner X' Do? There May Be An Answer

The story of "Prisoner X" is dominating the media in both Australia and Israel.
William West AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 7:28 am

If you've followed the story of "Prisoner X," the mysterious Israeli-Australian national, who allegedly committed suicide in an Israeli prison after being secretly held, you have no doubt asked yourself: What did Ben Zygier, who worked for Israel's spy agency, do for the country to imprison him and then keep everything about his arrest — or even his existence — secret for years?

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Movies
12:20 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Scorsese Talks 'The Language of Cinema'

Animated as ever when it comes to the topic of film, director Martin Scorsese delivers the 2013 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities at the Kennedy Center on April 1.
NIcholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 1:34 pm

Martin Scorsese is a legend of a director — and he's also a great film teacher, a man who balances a passion for the medium with a deep knowledge of its history. Delivering this year's installment of the National Endowment for the Humanities' prestigious Jefferson Lecture — a talk he titled "Persistence of Vision: Reading the Language of Cinema" — Scorsese demonstrated his speaking chops as well.

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Monkey See
11:54 am
Tue May 7, 2013

These Dogs, Cats And Robots Have A Few 'Tiny Confessions'

Penguin

Let me tell you a quick story from NPR's move from our old headquarters to our new one.

When I was emptying out my old desk and workspace, in addition to all the shoes under my desk and an alarming number of vessels designed to keep coffee warm, I had quite a lot of books lying around. Some were upcoming books, most were old books, and a few were books I neither had any use for nor could bear to get rid of. One of the tests I applied was that if I picked up a book and the first page I opened to made me laugh, it survived.

Tiny Confessions survived.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Limo Fire: Driver, Passenger Tell Their Stories

Investigators are trying to determine why the a limousine burst into flames on a San Francisco Bay bridge, trapping and killing five of the nine passengers late Saturday night. Foster City Fire Department Chief Michael Keefe, right, speaks as Redwood City California Highway Patrol Commander Mike Maskarich stands by Monday.
Jeff Chiu AP

The four women who survived a fire that erupted in a moving limousine Saturday did so by squeezing through a narrow partition window between the passenger cabin and the driver's area. As we reported Monday, the tragedy claimed the lives of five other women on a bridge over San Francisco Bay.

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The Salt
11:04 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Wake Up And Smell The Tuna? Sunrise At Honolulu's Fish Auction

Among the 50,000 pounds of fish at the Honolulu auction last Friday was this opah, or moonfish, Lampris regius.
Joe Palca NPR

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 8:48 am

If you are up at 5 in the morning in Honolulu and are wondering what to do, I have a suggestion: Head over to Pier 38 and watch the Honolulu Fish Auction. It's quite a scene.

Getting up at 5 may seem a bit extreme, but for recent arrivals to Hawaii from the East Coast of the mainland — as I was last Friday — the six-hour time difference makes waking up early easy, if not inevitable.

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National Security
10:58 am
Tue May 7, 2013

FBI Most Wanted Terrorists List: Who Is Assata Shakur?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we are going to hear more about that very disturbing story out of Cleveland, where three women who'd been missing for years were finally able to escape. That's in just a few minutes. But first, we want to find out more about a woman named Joanne Deborah Chesimard, aka Assata Shakur.

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U.S.
10:58 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Burying Tamerlan: Bostonians Say Not In Our Backyard

There's controversy about what to do with the body of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev. But what happened to the bodies of other similar figures in recent history like Adam Lanza or the Virginia Tech shooter? Host Michel Martin finds out.

Race
10:58 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Missing Ohio Women Found But Bigger Message About Race?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes, we are going to talk about the controversy over where the remains of one of the Boston bombing suspects should be buried. But first we want to talk about that very disturbing story out of Cleveland where three woman, all apparently abducted at different times, all missing for many years, finally managed to escape.

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Planet Money
10:56 am
Tue May 7, 2013

A 'Poison Pill' In The Immigration Bill?

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 8:51 am

That big immigration bill working its way through the Senate would let in lots more highly skilled workers on temporary visas. But there's a catch.

The bill says all employers who want to hire workers on these H-1B visas:

... would be required to advertise on an Internet website maintained by the Department of Labor and offer the job to any U.S. worker who applies and is equally or better qualified than the immigrants ... sought...

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The Two-Way
10:29 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Sexual Assaults In Military Have Increased By A Third Since 2010

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 2:23 pm

A Pentagon survey estimating sexual assaults in the military finds that cases have spiked by a third since 2010.

USA Today obtained a summary of the report, which is due out later this week. The newspaper reports that in 2010, 19,300 service members were believed to be victims of sexual assault; that number went up to 26,000 in 2012.

The paper adds:

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Shots - Health News
10:18 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Veterans Have Unusual Choice Thanks To Health Exchanges

When the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs held a hearing recently, members expressed concern that veterans might not qualify for subsidies for the new health insurance marketplaces if they were enrolled in VA health coverage.

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Monkey See
10:16 am
Tue May 7, 2013

So Much For Bowling Scenes: What Is And Isn't Wrong With Number-Crunching Scripts

iStockphoto.com

The words "grossed out" evoke enough of a watery 1980s vibe that they need to be saved for the times when they really apply: movie scenes where somebody sticks something in somebody else's eye, sewage spills, and so forth.

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U.S.
10:04 am
Tue May 7, 2013

FBI Agent: 'Nightmare Is Over' For Kidnapped Women

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. This is one of those news stories that leaves your jaw on the floor; an incredible story in Cleveland. Three women who were kidnapped a decade ago have been found alive, in a house not far from where they disappeared.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS CONFERENCE)

STEPHEN ANTHONY: For Amanda's family, for Gina's family, for Michelle's family, prayers have finally been answered. The nightmare is over.

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The Two-Way
9:16 am
Tue May 7, 2013

N.J. Gov. Christie Underwent Weight-Loss Surgery In February

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is surrounded by security and journalists in 2012.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 3:29 pm

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, whose weight has been both joked about and treated as a real health concern, told The New York Post on Monday that he "secretly underwent lap-band stomach surgery [in February] to aggressively slim down for the sake of his wife and kids."

"I've struggled with this issue for 20 years," he told the Post. "For me, this is about turning 50 and looking at my children and wanting to be there for them."

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Shots - Health News
8:08 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Saving Newborns: 'Kangaroo Care' Could Go A Long Way

A health worker weighs a Somali baby on scales at a medical clinic in Mogadishu. Babies in Somalia have the highest risk of dying within the first 24 hours after birth.
Carl de Souza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 8:46 am

In the developing world, a baby's first day of life is often the most perilous.

Roughly 3 million newborns die each year, the nonprofit Save the Children reported Tuesday. Most of these deaths occur in the first week of life, and more than 1 million babies pass away within 24 hours of being born.

Although the report calls for some big changes in health care systems to prevent newborn deaths, it also says that some simple, inexpensive things could save many lives.

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