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Author Interviews
12:41 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Of Neurons And Memories: Inside The 'Secret World Of Sleep'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 1:13 pm

What happens in our brains while we're asleep? That's one question neuroscientist Penelope Lewis is trying to answer. She directs the Sleep and Memory Lab at the University of Manchester in England. Her new book is The Secret World of Sleep: The Surprising Science of the Mind at Rest.

Lewis joins Fresh Air's Terry Gross to talk about how sleep affects memory, and how REM sleep can affect depression.


Interview Highlights

On how sleep makes memory stronger

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Book Reviews
12:41 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Gossipy, Nostalgic History Of A Publishing 'Hothouse'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 2:28 pm

In the world of book publishing, ravaged though it may be, the name Farrar, Straus & Giroux still bespeaks literary quality. It's a publishing house that boasts a roll call of 25 Nobel Prize winners and heavyweights like Susan Sontag, Carlos Fuentes, Joan Didion, Philip Roth and Jonathan Franzen. A lot of writers, past and present, have turned down higher advances for their books from other publishing houses for the honor of being an FSG author.

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

2013 Wildfire Season Proving To Be More Mild Than Wild

Firefighters battle a wildfire earlier this month in Cabazon, Calif.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 2:31 pm

With 15,000 firefighters deployed and three dozen major wildfires currently burning in five Western states, this would seem to be a wildfire season for the record books. And in one tragic aspect, it is. But by most measures, 2013 is the second-mildest fire season in the past decade ... so far.

Here's the season to date, by the numbers (provided by the National Interagency Fire Center) and with some historic statistics for comparison.

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Parallels
12:05 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Syrian Village Surrounded By Civil War

Rebels hold the central Syrian region of Al Houleh, but the area is surrounded by government troops. Supplies have to be smuggled in, like these fruits and vegetables that are being transported across Houleh Lake.
Rasha Elass

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:35 am

Before Syria's civil war, Al Houleh was a small, quiet farming region to the north of Homs. But a massacre last year, blamed on government loyalists, left several dozen villagers dead.

Since then, the Al Houleh region has become rebel-held territory, and government troops are choking it. Trapped in the siege are several hundred civilians, all of them related to the rebels.

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The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

What's Up With That, Doc? Researchers Make Bunnies Glow

Those are bright bunnies. (The photo shows the two that have the "glowing gene," along with their siblings.)
University of Hawaii's John A. Burns School of Medicine

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 12:44 pm

Like cats and other animals before them, a couple of rabbits are now among the animals that have been genetically manipulated so that they glow green under a black light.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Thu August 15, 2013

'Mature' Galaxies Around Not Long After Big Bang, Study Says

Chart showing galaxy formation 11 billion years ago.
ESA/Hubble

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 2:42 pm

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope to peer some 11 billion light-years into space and as many years back in time have seen something they didn't expect: fully formed galaxies when the universe was still quite young.

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The Salt
11:18 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Even Carnivores Are Putting More Fake Meat On Their Plates

Burger King's veggie burger is among the many meat substitute options on the market.
NPR

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 12:34 pm

From Bill Gates to Google's Sergei Brin, influential investors are putting their money where their mouth is. The pet cause of the tech world, it seems, is the need to find good-tasting substitutes to conventional animal products, like chicken-less eggs or in vitro beef, to avert environmental crisis from rising consumption.

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Beauty Shop
11:13 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Snooty Swiss Saleswoman Equals Racism?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we head to Barbados for a twisted family tale that spans centuries. "Sugar in the Blood" is the latest in our summer island read series. More on that in just a few minutes. But first, a visit to the beauty shop. That's where our panel of female commentators and journalists get a fresh cut on the week's news.

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Books
11:08 am
Thu August 15, 2013

A Family Tree That Includes Slaves — And Slave Owners

Andrea Stuart is also the author of The Rose of Martinique: A Life of Napoleon's Josephine.
Clara Molden Camera Press Redux

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:15 pm

Part of our summer reading series Island Reads, highlighting authors from the Caribbean

Andrea Stuart was curious about her family's history in Barbados. And through years of careful research, she found that her bloodline includes both slave owners and slaves. She has written about her own family, as well as a detailed history of slavery in the Caribbean, in her book Sugar in the Blood. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Stuart about her family history, the moral complexity of slavery and finding roots in the past.

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World
11:08 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Is Democracy Finished In Egypt?

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:33 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. We start today in Egypt. Hundreds of people are dead. Thousands more are injured there. That's after the military staged an assault on the camps of protesters, targeting specifically the supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. The military now has the country on lockdown and has declared a state of emergency, but members of the Muslim Brotherhood vow to continue protesting until Morsi is reinstated.

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The Picture Show
11:03 am
Thu August 15, 2013

How To Draw Out Your Worst Fears

Pat, 66, fears losing her memory.
Courtesy of Julie Elman

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 1:25 pm

A few years ago, Julie Elman, an associate professor at Ohio University, was stuck in a creative rut. As a design educator and illustrator, most of her work was done on the computer. She wanted to begin a tangible project — remember those? — but didn't really know where to start.

Then she realized there was one emotion she was strangely preoccupied with: fear. "I thought fears would go away as we get older," she remembers thinking. "I'm in my 50s. Why do I still have fears?"

And that is how The Fear Project was born.

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Middle East
10:40 am
Thu August 15, 2013

U.S. Cancels Military Exercise With Egypt Amid Crackdown

President Obama announced the cancellation of a joint military exercise with Egypt in the wake of that country's military government crackdown on protesters. At least 500 were killed in those skirmishes, including 40 police. For more, David Greene speaks with NPR's Scott Horsley.

The Two-Way
10:14 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Obama 'Strongly Condemns' Crackdown In Egypt

President Obama, speaking Thursday from the island of Martha's Vineyard, Mass., said the U.S. has canceled joint military exercises with Egypt.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:05 pm

  • President Obama's comments about the crisis in Egypt; Aug. 15, 2013

"The United States strongly condemns the steps that have been taken by Egypt's interim government" that have led to civilians "being killed in the streets," President Obama said Thursday from Martha's Vineyard, Mass., where he is vacationing with his family.

He called on Egypt's interim government to lift the state of emergency it has declared and said the U.S. has canceled joint military exercises with Egypt that had been scheduled for September.

"Our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual while civilians are being killed in the streets," Obama said.

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The Salt
9:57 am
Thu August 15, 2013

If You Liked That Wine, You Should've Put A Ring On It

Not just for single ladies:
Courtesy of Remy Martin

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:53 pm

Oh, Beyonce would be so proud.

Blurring the lines between jewelry and glassware, a Turkish art student has designed a set of rings made specifically for sniffing and sipping Remy Martin cognac and other adult beverages.

One ring perches a petite wineglass upon your finger. Another is a miniature snifter, attached to your hand — so you'll always be ready if you stumble upon some Robin Thicke limited edition V.S.O.P.

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The Two-Way
9:52 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Pine Ridge Reservation Lifts Century-Old Alcohol Ban

A sign on a building in Whiteclay, Neb., urging Pine Ridge Indian Reservation residents to approve the legalization of alcohol sales.
Carson Walker AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 11:25 am

Native Americans at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota have voted to overturn a more than century-old ban on alcohol in a decision that critics say will spur an increase in already high rates of domestic abuse, suicide and infant mortality.

Tribe members finalized the vote count Wednesday: 1,871 for legalization and 1,679 against.

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