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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

If You Believe The Farmer's Almanac, Get A Good Coat

Snow sticks to the trees along Levee Road during a winter storm in December of 2012 in Baraboo, Wisconsin.
Tom Lynn Getty Images

If you believe The Farmer's Almanac, this upcoming winter is going to be pretty brutal for most of the country.

This is how Caleb Weatherbee, the pseudonym of the 197-year-old publication's official forecaster, put it in a piece today, announcing the new forecast:

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The Two-Way
1:12 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Ginsburg Says She Plans To Stay On High Court No Matter The President

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in October of 2010.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

In a rare interview, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she plans to stay on the court, no matter who is president.

Ginsburg, 80 and the leader of the court's liberal wing, spoke to The New York Times at length on Friday. The whole piece is a worth a read, but here two highlights.

On her potential retirement, she said:

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Sun August 25, 2013

New York A.G. Sues Donald Trump Over 'Unlicensed' University

Donald Trump, chairman and president of the Trump Organization and founder of Trump Entertainment Resorts, delivers remarks during the second day of the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in March.
Alex Wong Getty Images

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is suing Donald Trump's for-profit investment school, "Trump University," which the lawsuit claims operated as an unlicensed educational institution for about six years and was essentially an "elaborate bait-and-switch" operation.

The New York Times reports:

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Ecstatic Voices
11:03 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Atheists Take Old Hymns Out Of The Chapel And Into The Streets

The Renaissance Street Singers give a performance at the Winterdale Arch, near the West 81st Street gate in Central Park.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 9:16 am

On a recent Sunday afternoon, 15 members of the Renaissance Street Singers gathered under a bridge in New York's Central Park. With little fanfare, they launched into a free, two-hour concert of music by Palestrina, des Prez and other composers who lived more than 500 years ago.

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The Two-Way
9:01 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Wildfire Near Yosemite Spreads, Threatens Ancient Trees

A firefighter uses a hose to douse the flames of the Rim Fire on Saturday near Groveland, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The massive wildfire that's burning on the northwest edge of Yosemite National Park is spreading, threatening to destroy thousands of rural homes and also posing a threat to beloved ancient sequoias.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Syria Will Allow U.N. To Inspect Chemical Weapons Claims

In this photo taken on a government organized media tour, a Syrian army soldier walks on a street in the Jobar neighborhood of Damascus, Syria, on Saturday.
AP

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 7:38 pm

This post was last updated at 8:36 p.m. ET. (For the latest updates click here.)

The United Nations says it is sending inspectors to the site of a suspected chemical weapons attack in Damascus, Syria.

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Space
7:04 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Far Out: Voyager 1 Might Be Over The Edge, Into Deep Space

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:29 am

For the past decade, scientists have been waiting for the Voyager 1 spacecraft to cross into deep space. New research suggests it has left the solar system, but other scientists say it's still inside the sun's sphere of influence. (This piece initially aired Aug. 19, 2013, on Morning Edition.)

PG-13: Risky Reads
6:03 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Braving Both Napoleonic France And Teenage Angst With Aplomb

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 9:57 am

Fiona Maazel's latest novel is Woke Up Lonely.

The way my mom likes to tell it, I wasn't much of a reader growing up. My chief complaint of every book she dumped in my lap was that nothing happens. Ten pages in and no one had died.

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Author Interviews
4:19 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Haitian Youth Illuminated In 'Sea Light'

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:22 am

On her 7th birthday, a little girl named Claire disappears in a seaside Haitian village. Through Claire's fictional journey, award-winning author Edwidge Danticat shares glimmers of her own childhood in Haiti.

In Claire of the Sea Light, the protagonist's mother died during childbirth, and her father is a poor fisherman, struggling to make ends meet. Just moments before his daughter disappears, Claire's father had agreed to let a local woman adopt her in hopes of giving his daughter a better life.

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Sunday Puzzle
4:18 am
Sun August 25, 2013

It's All Greek To Me

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:22 am

On-air challenge: You're given some sentences. Each sentence conceals the name of a language in consecutive letters. Name the language. Each answer has five or more letters.

Last week's challenge: The Roman numeral for 38 is XXXVIII. What is special or unusual about this Roman numeral that sets it apart from every other Roman numeral that can be written?

Answer: If every possible Roman numeral were listed in alphabetical order, XXXVIII would be last.

Winner: Joseph Kuperberg of Pittsford, N.Y.

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The Salt
4:17 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Dishwasher Cooking: Make Your Dinner While Cleaning The Plates

Food writer Dan Pashman says poached pears are great in the dishwasher. We're not sure about the asparagus, but we'll let you know after the cycle finishes.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 1:10 pm

My mom is a creative cook. And a darn good one at that.

But when she told me and my sister — way back in 1995 — that she had started cooking salmon in the dishwasher, we just rolled our eyes and shook our heads. Here comes a kitchen catastrophe.

An hour later, mom proved her teenage daughters wrong once again. The salmon was tender, moist and super flavorful. In some ways, it was better than her fish cooked in the oven.

Flash-forward 18 years, and dishwasher cuisine seems to be making a comeback.

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Shots - Health News
4:17 am
Sun August 25, 2013

The Same Tents That Seal Storms Out Can Seal Carbon Monoxide In

Headlamps make cold nights cozier, but leave the fuel-burning lanterns and stoves outside.
Gopal Vijayaraghavan Flickr

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 7:31 am

Staying snug within a watertight tent as a storm rages around you is one of the joys of modern camping and modern tents.

But if the weather suddenly turns nasty on your next camping trip, or nights are just colder than you expected, don't be tempted to bring your cook stove inside. Levels of poisonous carbon monoxide (CO) from the burning stove can build up fast.

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It's All Politics
4:16 am
Sun August 25, 2013

A Guide To The Nation's Most Vulnerable Governors

Gov. Tom Corbett addresses a joint session of the Pennsylvania House and Senate on Feb. 5 in Harrisburg.
Matt Rourke AP

If you're looking for the most interesting gubernatorial races to watch in the coming year, the nation's biggest states are a good place to start.

Democrats Jerry Brown and Andrew Cuomo look like safe bets for re-election in California and New York, respectively. And, despite the pending retirement of Rick Perry, Republicans are confident of maintaining their hold on the governor's mansion in Texas.

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The Picture Show
4:46 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

New And Returning Faces Reflect On The March On Washington

Gerald Bundy of Philadelphia was 13 when his older cousin convinced him to go to the March on Washington in 1963. Bundy returned 50 years later to celebrate the anniversary. When he looks back on it now he believes the experience, "made me more cognizant of social justice; made me an activist."
Chloe Coleman NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:23 pm

Tens of thousands of people congregated in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom — one of the largest civil rights rallies in American history, and the day that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his indelible "I Have A Dream" speech.

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Race
4:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

50 Years Later, A March On Washington Among Generations

Demonstrators on Saturday in Washington, D.C., commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 2:55 pm

They came by the beat of drums: grandparents with their grandchildren, community organizers and activists, church members and college students.

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