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NPR Story
10:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Tracing The Origins Of French Winemaking

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:33 pm

Many people associate France today with the production of great wines. But winemaking isn't native to the French. Patrick McGovern, an archaeologist of fermented beverages, has dated the beginning of viniculture in France to around 500 B.C. and contact with the Etruscans.

NPR Story
10:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

How To Survive A Mass Extinction

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Up next, surviving the big one, and I mean a really big one. As any fan of dinosaurs knows, extinction happens. The Earth isn't immune to assaults. You've got your asteroids, your volcanic eruptions, events that cause so much disruption to the environment that eventually life or most of life is wiped out.

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Shots - Health News
10:24 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Can Ketamine Keep Depression At Bay?

Ketamine, used as a tranquilizer for animals and as an anesthetic in humans, is also being tested as a treatment for depression.
Victoria Arocho AP

When it comes to profound depression, many people just can't get relief from current treatments.

Now there's more evidence that the anesthetic ketamine, sometimes abused as a club drug, has potential as a fast-acting treatment for the condition.

Doctors at the Mayo Clinic gave 10 patients ketamine twice a week as an infusion that lasted 100 minutes. All the people had depression that had resisted other treatments. The patients got ketamine until their symptoms abated or they'd had four infusions of the drug.

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Koreas Agree To Talks But Can't Decide What Kind Or Where

Tents at the Korean armistice conference in June 1951. Pyongyang stalled the talks by arguing over such minutiae as the height of chair legs.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:50 pm

The two Koreas have agreed in principle to talks aimed at mending their almost nonexistent relations, but they are stalled on the question of where to meet.

South Korea has suggested that high-level talks take place in its capital, Seoul, but North Korea has countered that only lower-level negotiations should take place and they should be held in its border city of Kaesong.

The rival Koreas have not met face to face for such negotiations since February 2011.

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Economy
10:19 am
Fri June 7, 2013

No Big Waves In The Labor Pool

Shoppers walk along Broadway in New York City. Retailers added 28,000 in May amid signs of strength in consumer spending.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:44 pm

June is a nice month for treading water — if you happen to be in a swimming pool.

But if you are in the labor pool and trying to make your way toward a job, a stronger current in the right direction would be appreciated.

Unfortunately, the jobs report released Friday by the Labor Department showed that the economy continues to drift along at a languid pace.

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Shhh! World's Powerful People Are Meeting In Secret Again

What goes on up the road is only for those in the know to know: Police stood guard Thursday near the Grove Hotel in Watford, England, where "The Bilderberg" group is meeting this year.
Nick Ansell PA Photos /Landov

There's "no detailed agenda, no resolutions are proposed, no votes are taken, and no policy statements are issued."

And as The Associated Press says, "what happens at Bilderberg, stays at Bilderberg."

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Planet Money
10:07 am
Fri June 7, 2013

When Patents Attack ... Part Two!

National Archives

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 7:29 pm

This story from Planet Money's Alex Blumberg and NPR's Laura Sydell aired this weekend on This American Life. A shorter version of the piece is also airing today on All Things Considered. Here's the story.

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Arts & Life
9:26 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Becoming Traviata': A Look At Opera From Behind The Curtain

Soprano Natalie Dessay, with tenor Charles Castonovo, in Philippe Béziat's documentary Becoming Traviata.
Distrib Films

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 7:03 am

It's easy to think of opera as little more than an affected flock of singers warbling onstage in lacy brocade with pancake makeup, chandeliers and champagne.

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TED Radio Hour
9:07 am
Fri June 7, 2013

What Are The Clues To A Good Story?

Andrew Stanton on the TED stage in 2012.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 9:28 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Andrew Stanton's TEDTalk

Filmmaker Andrew Stanton shares what he knows about storytelling — starting at the end and working back to the beginning. Earlier this episode, Stanton shared a story that does exactly that.

About Andrew Stanton

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Ask Me Another
9:06 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Lizz Winstead: The Dictionary From A To Lizz

Lizz Winstead. Her latest book of funny essays is Lizz Free Or Die.
Mindy Tucker

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 11:01 am

Lizz Winstead has an impressive resume. She's a veteran stand-up comic, co-created both The Daily Show and Air America Radio, and is the author of the book Lizz Free or Die. But Winstead is also a bonafide word nerd and game fanatic. Which means she was right at home on the Ask Me Another stage.

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TED Radio Hour
9:06 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Framing The Story

"I think stories are necessary, just as necessary as food and love. It's how we make meaning of our lives." — Chimamanda Adichie
TED

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 8:29 am

Stories ignite our imagination, let us leap over cultural walls and cross the barriers of time. In this hour, TED speakers explore the art of storytelling — and how good stories have the power to transform our perceptions of the world.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
8:17 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Oops! France's François Hollande Confuses China And Japan

French President François Hollande is welcomed by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe prior to their meeting at Abe's official residence in Tokyo.
Toru Tamanaka AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 3:32 pm

It is as embarrassing a diplomatic gaffe as you can make: French President François Hollande was in the same room as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, this morning, when he offered the "Chinese people" condolences for the 10 citizens it lost during the Algerian hostage crisis in January.

The Guardian reports:

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Interviews
8:16 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'The Life That Follows' Disarming IEDs In Iraq

Brian Castner served as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer in the U.S. Air Force from 1999 to 2007, deploying to Iraq to command bomb disposal units in Balad and Kirkuk in 2005 and 2006.
Joey Campagna Courtesy of the author

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 1:30 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on July 8, 2012.

Brian Castner arguably had one of the most nerve-wracking jobs in the U.S. military. He commanded two Explosive Ordnance Disposal units in Iraq, where his team disabled roadside IEDs, investigated the aftermath of roadside car bombings and searched door to door to uncover bomb-makers at their homes.

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
8:09 am
Fri June 7, 2013

It's All Politics, June 6, 2013

Chip Somodevilla Getty Images
  • Listen to the Roundup

N.J. Gov. Chris Christie's political future is affected by the death of Sen. Frank Lautenberg, President Obama dares Republicans to stop his court nominees and Michigan's John Dingell makes history in Congress. NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin review it all in the latest It's All Politics podcast.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
7:38 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Job Growth Was Slow And Steady In May, But Jobless Rate Rose

Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 9:41 am

There was modest job growth once again in May even as the nation's unemployment rate ticked up, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday.

According to BLS:

-- 175,000 jobs were added to public and private payrolls last month, slightly more than economists had expected.

-- The jobless rate rose to 7.6 percent from April's 7.5 percent. That rate can rise even as more jobs are added because the size of the labor force has also gone up.

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