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6:18 am
Sun October 6, 2013

San Diego Air Show Grounded By Shutdown

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 10:14 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The shutdown is affecting communities all over the country. We're going now to San Diego. There is a big U.S. Navy presence in town and San Diego is home to the Miramar Air Show. But that show has been cancelled this weekend due to the partial government shutdown. In past years, the event has drawn over half a million people, earned millions of dollars for programs that help military families. NPR's Sam Sanders reports from San Diego.

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Politics
6:18 am
Sun October 6, 2013

The Debt Ceiling Looms Over Budget Showdown

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 10:14 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
6:18 am
Sun October 6, 2013

An American Jewish 'Bride' Remembers Her Escape From Kabul

In her memoir, Phyllis Chesler questions whether she and her first husband, Abdul-Kareem, were ever really in love. "Were we soul mates?" she writes. "I am not sure. I dare not remember — the pain would be overwhelming and pointless."
Courtesy Palgrave Macmillan

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 10:14 am

Phyllis Chesler and Abdul-Kareem met in college. She was an 18-year-old Jewish girl from the East Coast; he was a young Muslim man from a wealthy Afghan family. They fell in love over New Wave cinema, poetry and existentialism, and eventually they married.

In her new memoir, An American Bride in Kabul, Chesler tells her story of excitedly traveling to Afghanistan in 1961 with her new husband, who said he wanted to be a modernizing force in his country. But, as she tells NPR's Rachel Martin, her passport was almost immediately confiscated upon arrival.

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The Salt
6:18 am
Sun October 6, 2013

That Smoky Smell Means Chile Roasting Season In New Mexico

Fresh picked green chiles are bound for stews, burritos, enchiladas, pozole and more. Fall is chili roasting season in New Mexico.
Tim Robbins NPR

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 12:39 pm

It's chile season in New Mexico, where they take their chiles pretty seriously.

Indeed, the chile is the official state vegetable, so it's probably best to not mention it is actually a fruit. No matter what it is, the fall harvest is on, and that means it's time to fire up the grills.

Green chiles roasting over a hot gas flame give off a smoky, sweet, pungent perfume.

That smell is part of what has drawn customers like Lorenzo and Peggy Lucero to the Diaz farm in Deming, in southwest New Mexico, for the past 30 years.

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Around the Nation
6:18 am
Sun October 6, 2013

In This Business, Scaredy Cats Need Not Apply

To get an interview at the Scream Zone in San Diego County, Calif., applicants have to get past a green demon first.
Beth Accomando for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 7:42 am

Every job requires a special skill set.

In this business, screaming is one of those skills. Also, being certified on a chainsaw.

"We're always looking for folks who have a passion for wielding a chainsaw while wearing makeup and costume and just scaring the heck out of people," says Jennifer Struever.

Streuver is the event manager for Scream Zone at the Del Mar Fairgrounds in San Diego County, Calif. Haunted houses are part of the multibillion-dollar business of Halloween — and they need employees.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
6:03 am
Sun October 6, 2013

'Spell'-Bound By A Goofy Book — And Later, United By It

Melissa de la Cruz and her husband Michael Johnston are the co-authors of Frozen.

How is this a risky read, you might ask? Piers Anthony's Xanth series is a tongue-firmly-in-cheek affair, filled with awful puns about bad dreams delivered by horses — literal "night mares" — and corny jokes about how Xanth is eerily similar to the geography of Florida, the author's home state.

Isn't this book just funny? How is it risky? Or dark? Or adult? Yet precisely because of its naughty, offhand humor, we found it risky and thrilling. Let us explain ...

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Parallels
5:10 am
Sun October 6, 2013

As Afghan Troops Take The Lead, They Take More Casualties

Afghan medics at Forward Operating Base Nolay in the southern province of Helmand treat an Afghan police officer shot by militants.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:46 am

The Taliban have been waging a particularly bloody offensive this year now that Afghan government forces are in charge of security. The result: Afghan army and police are suffering record numbers of casualties — far more than NATO ever did at the height of its troop presence in Afghanistan.

So even as NATO forces are preparing to leave, they are working to bolster the medical capabilities of Afghan forces at hospitals, clinics and training centers across the country.

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Movie Interviews
5:08 am
Sun October 6, 2013

Revisiting The Doomed On Their Quest For 'The Summit'

Pemba Gyalje Sherpa survived his August 2008 climb on K2 and was even able to help save some of the other expeditionaries. But 11 died trying to conquer the mountain that month.
Robbie Ryan IFC Films

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 6:05 pm

Mountain climbing requires stamina and skill, but at some point — especially on the world's tallest and riskiest peaks — it becomes a game of chance. In August of 2008, if you were one of the dozens of people trying to climb to the top of K2, the odds of your living to tell your story weren't good: During the last push to the summit and the immediate descent that followed, 11 people died.

In the documentary The Summit, filmmaker Nick Ryan tries to piece together what happened in what has been called the deadliest event in modern mountain climbing.

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Shots - Health News
5:02 am
Sun October 6, 2013

It's Time To Rediscover The IUD, Women's Health Advocates Say

Intrauterine devices are one of the most effect forms of birth control, but are relatively underutilized, at least in the United States.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:56 pm

What will it take to make intrauterine devices sexy?

IUDs are highly effective forms of contraception, but fear of side effects, lack of training for doctors and costs can keep women away. Health organizations and private companies are trying to change that by breaking down misconceptions and broadening access.

The contraceptives are inserted into the uterus and can prevent pregnancy for years. And they're reversible. Shortly after they're taken out, a woman can become pregnant.

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Parallels
5:00 am
Sun October 6, 2013

Car-Centric Spain Begins To Embrace The Bicycle

Cyclists whiz past Madrid's Puerta de Alcalá monument as part of Bici Crítica, a movement that seeks to raise awareness of bike safety. On the last Thursday of every month, thousands of cyclists ride in unison through downtown Madrid, blocking traffic during rush hour.
Lauren Frayer NPR

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:47 am

For the first time on record, bicycles have outsold cars in Spain.

Higher taxes on fuel and on new cars have prompted cash-strapped Spaniards to opt for two wheels instead of four. Last year, 780,000 bicycles were sold in the country — compared to 700,000 cars. That's due to a 4 percent jump in bike sales, and a 30 percent drop in sales of new cars.

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The Two-Way
3:33 am
Sun October 6, 2013

U.S. Captures Al-Qaida Leader After Raids In Libya And Somalia

Abu Anas al-Libi, wanted in the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies that killed more than 200 people, reportedly has been captured in Libya.
FBI EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 11:37 am

U.S. forces carried out two commando raids on suspected terrorist in Northern Africa Saturday.

In Libya, an al-Qaida leader indicted in the United States for the 1998 attacks on two U.S. embassies in East Africa was captured in a daytime military raid. U.S. special forces captured the militant, known as Abu Anas al-Libi, near Tripoli.

Update at 12:15 p.m ET: Libya Asks U.S. About 'Kidnapping'

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All Tech Considered
5:50 pm
Sat October 5, 2013

U.S. Shutdown May Be Driving Traffic To 'Sugar Daddy' Sites

A sugar daddy dating website says nearly 14,000 women have joined since Sept. 29, as the federal government prepared to shut down.
Cat London iStockPhoto.com

sugar daddy (noun): a well-to-do usually older man who supports or spends lavishly on a mistress, girlfriend, or boyfriend

The government shutdown may have become a boon for one kind of online dating site — those that help users find sugar daddies.

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NPR Story
5:36 pm
Sat October 5, 2013

House Votes To Give Back Pay To Furloughed Feds

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Christina Bellantoni is the politics editor for "PBS NewsHour." She joins us to talk about the latest from Washington. Christina, welcome.

CHRISTINA BELLANTONI: Thanks for having me.

RATH: So first, let's talk about how this is playing out politically. There's been a lot of talk about who's to blame for the shutdown. Polls are showing most Americans blame the Republicans in the House. But do you think that's going to continue, if the shutdown drags on?

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History
4:45 pm
Sat October 5, 2013

150 Years After Battle Of Gettysburg, Shutdown Hindering History Tours

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 5:36 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

From NPR West, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Arun Rath.

The U.S. government has been shut down for five days. Earlier today, the House of Representatives voted to grant federal workers back pay when the shutdown ends, but there is no sign that end is coming anytime soon. And frustration among those on the job is growing.

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Technology
4:45 pm
Sat October 5, 2013

Developers At Indie Game Festival Looking For Big Break

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:25 am

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Sales of the insanely popular video game "Grand Theft Auto V" passed the billion-dollar mark just three days after its release this month. But not everyone sees mainstream titles as the industry's game changers. When searching for the next big thing, some of the biggest gaming companies actually look to the little guys: indie game developers. And as NPR's Daniel Hajek reports, they're finding them this weekend at a Los Angeles festival that brings out the underground talent.

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