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Politics
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

'It Takes A Crisis': How '73 Embargo Fueled Change In U.S.

Drivers and a man pushing a lawnmower line up at gas station in San Jose, Calif., in March 1974.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 6:26 pm

Americans started thinking differently about U.S. dependence on imported oil 40 years ago this Sunday. Decades later, the U.S. is in the midst of a homegrown energy boom.

The oil embargo began in 1973. The United States had long taken cheap and plentiful oil for granted when Saudi Arabia shocked the country by suddenly cutting off all direct oil shipments in retaliation for U.S. support of Israel. Other Arab countries followed suit.

Prices soared. Gasoline lines stretched for blocks. Richard Nixon became the first of many U.S. presidents to call for energy independence.

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Politics
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Can The GOP Put Its Internal Feuds Behind It?

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 6:40 am

This week, politicians and pundits of almost all persuasions seemed to agree that the Republican Party took a hit from the shutdown. But Jonah Goldberg of the National Review sees a path forward. Hos Scott Simon talks with Goldberg about how the party can put its schisms behind it.

Politics
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Shutdown Is Wrapped Up, But Other Issues Are Starting To Unfold

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 6:40 am

The U.S. is back from the brink after a deal to reopen the government and lift the debt ceiling, but more crises may be on the horizon with a compromise budget due by mid-December and the federal government only funded through Jan. 15. Host Scott Simon speaks with NPR's senior Washington editor Ron Elving about what comes next.

Author Interviews
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

The Birth Of Bird: Young Charlie Parker Found Focus, Faith In Music

Charlie Parker started playing as a boy, when his mother gave him a saxophone to cheer him up after his father left. He went on to spearhead a musical revolution.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 6:40 am

Charlie "Bird" Parker was one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. In his brief life, Parker created a new sound on the alto saxophone and spearheaded a revolution in harmony and improvisation that pushed popular music from the swing era to bebop and modern jazz.

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Author Interviews
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

What's Really Priceless? Art, Money And Fate In Tartt's 'Goldfinch'

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 6:40 am

Theo Decker is a 13-year-old boy who, in an instant, gains a masterpiece, but loses his mother — who is also a kind of masterpiece.

Theo and his mother are looking at a special show of old Dutch Masters at the Met, and the little boy doesn't much enjoy it — "Dutch people standing around in Dutch clothes," he calls it. They see a painting of a little yellow pet finch, chained at the ankle, by an artist named Fabritius.

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Sports
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Calculating The Worth Of The Redskins Brand

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Washington, D.C.'s football team has been under increasing criticism for keeping an old team name that's a racial epithet. I usually don't say it. I will now - for the purposes of information. The Washington Redskins. That name's been hotly debated, criticized for being a racial slur, but defended by the team's owners as actually being a kind of tribute to Native Americans.

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Business
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Business Leaders Decry The Economic Cost Of Uncertainty

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 11:08 am

Running a company is like driving a car. You need to be able to see what's coming down the road. The dysfunction in Washington has created a fog, and when driving in the fog, you have to slow down.

That's basically what's happening at thousands of companies around the country.

Bob Mosey, chairman of the National Tooling and Machining Association, bemoans the "uncertainty of not being able to plan for the future."

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All Tech Considered
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Credit Cards Under Pressure To Police Online Expression

Some advocacy groups say credit card companies should stop doing business with websites that promote controversial views or policy positions.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 1:01 pm

Earlier this month, major credit card processors including MasterCard, Visa and America Express announced they would stop processing payments to websites that collect and publish mug shots online. The sites say they are providing a public service, but they make their money by charging people a fee to remove these embarrassing photos from the Internet.

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Code Switch
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

'12 Years' Is The Story Of A Slave Whose End Is A Mystery

In the new film adaptation of Twelve Years A Slave, Chiwetel Ejiofor plays Solomon Northup, a black man who was kidnapped and sold into slavery in 1841.
Jaap Buitendijk Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 10:18 am

There's a true American saga on screens this weekend.

Twelve Years a Slave tells the story of Solomon Northup. He was an African-American musician from New York — a free man, until he was kidnapped in Washington, D.C., and sold into slavery. After an unlikely rescue from a Louisiana cotton plantation, he returned home and wrote a memoir, first published 160 years ago.

But the end of Northup's story is an unsolved mystery that has confounded historians for years.

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Around the Nation
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Do-It-Yourself Library Brings Neighborhood Together

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

On the other hand, and we say that a lot in the news business, libraries with books on shelves are still with us, maybe closer than you think.

DINA MORENO: I can see the library from my kitchen window, just up. It's sort of out of the way, but I can just see it and I see people constantly going through there.

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Around the Nation
5:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Bookless Library In Texas Aims To 'Break Down The Barriers To Reading'

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. San Antonio's newest library doesn't look very bookish. It's got neon orange walls, a play area for children that has glowing screens, and it abounds with desktop computers, iPads, eBooks and laptops. They call it BiblioTech because it's completely digital. There is no paper in this library.

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The Two-Way
12:33 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Second Arrest Made In Connection With LAX Dry Ice Explosions

Police at Los Angeles International Airport stepped up patrols this week after two dry ice explosions. There have since been two arrests.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 9:30 am

The dry ice explosions at Los Angeles International Airport have led to a second arrest, police say.

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It's All Politics
6:46 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Tom Foley, A House Speaker Who Embraced Compromise And Comity

Democrat Tom Foley served Washington state's 5th Congressional District for 30 years and was House speaker from 1989 to 1995. He died Friday at age 84.
Jeff T. Green AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 7:16 pm

Former Speaker of the House Tom Foley was the product of far different times, yet his career in politics a generation ago still carries a message current congressional leaders might want to heed.

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The Two-Way
6:28 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Court Clears Way For Same-Sex Marriages In New Jersey

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 7:14 pm

Same-sex couples in New Jersey can begin marrying on Monday, after the state's Supreme Court rejected a request to halt the ceremonies.

Gov. Chris Christie had asked the court to block the weddings, while his administration appealed a lower court ruling that found the state's system of civil unions was unconstitutional.

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Politics
4:39 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Money For Dam Project In Shutdown Deal Riles Conservatives

The Olmsted Locks and Dam project is under construction on the Ohio River between Illinois and Kentucky.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 9:09 pm

This week's congressional compromise to end the government shutdown and raise the debt ceiling had a few other provisions as well.

One of them allows additional spending on a lock and dam project on the Ohio River between Kentucky and Illinois.

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