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NPR Story
4:03 am
Thu January 29, 2015

Why Don't More People Short Stocks? It's A Great Way To Lose Big Bucks

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NPR Story
4:03 am
Thu January 29, 2015

Attorney General Nomination Expected To Advance To Full Senate

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NPR Story
4:03 am
Thu January 29, 2015

GOP Presidential Hopefuls Debate At Koch Brothers Forum

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Economy
3:14 am
Thu January 29, 2015

For Long-Haul Drivers, Cheap Gas Means A Sweeter Commute

Jed Brown drives 100 miles each day to work between Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Cheaper gas is making his commute more manageable, but he doesn't expect the low prices to last.
Uri Berliner NPR

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 4:03 am

With wages still stuck for many Americans, the big drop in gas prices is the equivalent of an unexpected cash bonus for the nation's drivers.

The average American household is expected to save $750 this year from lower gas prices, according to the Energy Department.

But Thomas Kinnaman, an economist at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pa., says it's instructive to look beyond the word "average."

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Business
3:14 am
Thu January 29, 2015

And So We Meet, Again: Why The Workday Is So Filled With Meetings

PW Illustration Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 4:03 am

The ouster of Bryan Stockton from his CEO perch at Mattel this week came as the toy maker's best-known brands like Barbie stagnate and it loses business to Web-based games.

Stockton himself said last year that Mattel lacked an innovative culture and blamed it in part on something specific: bad meetings. That's a common and persistent corporate ailment.

Scott Ryan-Hart is a cartographer for the Ohio Department of Transportation, where a typical meeting can last more than two hours.

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Shots - Health News
3:12 am
Thu January 29, 2015

Insurance Choices Dwindle In Rural California As Blue Shield Pulls Back

Lori Lomas, an insurance agent with Feather Financial in Quincy, California, has noticed that her clients in San Francisco have many more health carrier options than her mountain neighbors.
Pauline Bartolone for KXJZ

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 4:03 am

After the insurance exchanges set up under the Affordable Care Act first went live in late 2013, Lori Lomas started combing the website of Covered California on a hunt for good deals for her clients. Lomas is an agent at Feather Financial, in the Sierra Nevada mountain town of Quincy, California; she's been selling health policies in rural communities for more than 20 years.

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The Two-Way
6:43 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

The Next Air Force One Will Be A Boeing 747-8

Air Force One, carrying President Obama, passes a Boeing building in Seattle. The Air Force has announced that the next Air Force One will also be a Boeing aircraft.
AP

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 7:22 pm

The Air Force has picked a new Air Force One, the Boeing 747-8, and it wasn't even a close race. In a statement announcing the pick, the Air Force said the decision was made "through a Determinations and Findings document, which "authorizes the commercial aircraft purchase by other than full and open competition."

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The Two-Way
6:28 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

Rare Fox Takes A Walk In The Park, And Yosemite Staff Cheer

A Sierra Nevada red fox was photographed twice in recent weeks, thanks to a remote motion-sensitive camera.
National Park Service

It's been nearly 100 years since a sighting of a Sierra Nevada red fox was documented in Yosemite National Park, according to park staff. But a remote motion-sensitive camera recently took photos of one of the rare animals as it padded across the snow.

"The Sierra Nevada red fox of California is one of the rarest mammals in North America," reports Ed Joyce of Capital Public Radio, "likely consisting of fewer than 50 individuals."

Now researchers believe they've seen one of the foxes twice since the start of December.

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The Salt
6:12 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

Coffee Horror: Parody Pokes At Environmental Absurdity Of K-Cups

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 8:55 pm

You want a cup of decaf. Your significant other is craving the fully caffeinated stuff. With the simple push of a button, Keurig's single-serving K-Cup coffee pods can make both of you happy.

But those convenient little plastic pods can pile up quickly, and they're not recyclable. And that's created a monster of an environmental mess, says Mike Hachey. Literally.

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The Two-Way
5:47 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

AG Nominee Lynch Says She Differs From Obama On Marijuana

Loretta Lynch, United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, leaves for a lunch break during a day-long Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on her nomination to be U.S. attorney general.
PETE MAROVICH UPI /Landov

During her first day of confirmation hearings for attorney general, nominee Loretta Lynch gave answers that seemed in line with President Obama. But then she was asked about marijuana, and whether she supports legalizing it.

"Senator, I do not," Lynch told Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., when he asked if she supported making pot legal.

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The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

Charles Townes, Laser Inventor, Black Hole Discoverer, Dies At 99

Nobel Prize-winning physicist Charles Townes was single-minded about a lot of things, colleagues say. And also a very nice guy.
Julian Wasser The LIFE Images Collection/Getty

Charles Townes, a physicist who won the Nobel Prize for his part in the invention of the laser died Tuesday at 99.

Townes is best remembered for thinking up the basic principles of the laser while sitting on a park bench. Later in life he helped advise the U.S. government and helped uncover the secrets of our Milky Way galaxy.

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Book News & Features
5:16 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

'Little House,' Big Demand: Never Underestimate Laura Ingalls Wilder

Laura Ingalls Wilder entertained generations of children with her "Little House" series, which was loosely based on her family's pioneering life. Her memoir, Pioneer Girl, was published in 2014.
South Dakota State Historical Society

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 7:19 pm

In 2014, the South Dakota State Historical Society published the annotated autobiography of Laura Ingalls Wilder, author of the "Little House" books. Her memoir, titled Pioneer Girl, sold like hotcakes. The initial print run of 15,000 was snapped up in just a few weeks. So was an additional run of 15,000 more copies. Now, the historical society is waiting on a third run of 45,000 books — enough to fill current demand and have some leftovers.

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U.S.
5:11 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

Beefed-Up Border Security Proposal Unsettles Texas Business Leaders

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 5:20 pm

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The Two-Way
5:10 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

McDonald's CEO Don Thompson Steps Down

McDonald's President and CEO Don Thompson is retiring and will be replaced by Steve Easterbrook, the fast-food giant said in a statement.

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Television
5:02 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

In 'The Americans,' Art Imitates Real Life Lies

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 5:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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