News

A federal judge has temporarily suspended enforcement of a state regulation that threatened to close one of the state's busiest abortion clinics.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson says the closure of the Tuscaloosa clinic could prevent women from obtaining abortions.

The West Alabama Women's Center of Tuscaloosa is challenging a 2007 state regulation.  It requires clinics to hire a physician with hospital-admitting privileges to handle patient complications

The mayor of Huntsville turned down local firefighters' request for a pay raise.

Mayor Tommy Battle says he won't seek higher pay for firefighters in next year's budget after an audit presented at last night’s city council meeting found the current wages are fair.

The Huntsville Firefighters Association has been pushing for a raise since February. It says starting salaries of city firefighters and police officers should at least be equal. Currently rookie police officers make about $2,200 a year more.

Leesburg Mayor Dies, Alabama DOC Job Fair

Aug 13, 2015

Cherokee County officials say Leesburg Mayor Edward Mackey has died after a bulldozer accident.

Coroner Jeremy Deaton says Edward Mackey died around 10:30 this morning at his home in Leesburg. Deaton says Mackey was working near his shop repairing a bulldozer when the equipment engaged and trapped him underneath.

Mackey is a Leesburg native and in his third term as mayor.

The Alabama Department of Corrections is looking to fill more than two hundred jobs.

“The Woman in the Photograph” 

Author: Dana Gynther

Publisher: Gallery Books

Pages: 352

Price: $16.00 (Paper)

Dana Gynther made her debut as a novelist in 2012 with “Crossing on the Paris,” a novel set aboard a transatlantic liner on her maiden voyage from Le Havre to New York. As the ship sails west, three women, one from first class, one from second and one from steerage, strangers until then, meet and exchange their life stories with rich flashbacks to their very different experiences in Paris

“Raising Aphrodite: A Novel”

Author: Kirk Curnutt

Publisher: River City Publishing

Pages: 413

$26.95 (Hardcover)

In Rogers and Hammerstein’s musical “Carousel,” Billy Bigelow, the erstwhile carousel barker, now married to Julie Jordan, is overjoyed when he learns he is to be a father. In the song “Soliloquy” he sings of his boy Bill. He’ll “teach him to wrestle and dive through a wave.” Bill might be a boxer or president.

“The Redeemers: A Quinn Colson Novel”

Author: Ace Atkins

Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons

Pages: 370 pp.

Price: $26.95 (Hardcover)

Ace Atkins is generating a shelf of novels at an astonishing pace. “Redeemers” is his seventeenth.

After graduation from Auburn where he played football, Ace—his real name—worked as a reporter in Florida, mainly crime. He has several standalone crime novels—historically based like “Wicked City,” set in Phenix City, and investigative/biographically based such as “Infamous,” about Fatty Arbuckle .

 

    

When people ask me about the classic Alabama governor’s races, the first that comes to mind is the 1970 Titanic clash between Albert Brewer and George Wallace.

 

Albert Brewer was smart and articulate with a charming smile and winning personality. He had lots of friends in the legislature having been a speaker and Lt. Governor. All that gave him a good grasp of state politics.  He smoothly took the reigns of state government upon the death of Lurleen Wallace

 

Birmingham's City Council president is defending the group’s recent decision to raise their salary from $15,000 to $55,000.

Some council members have said they have been asked to do full-time work on part-time pay.

Local media reports the nine-member council voted 8-1 to approve the raise last week and faced questions Tuesday night on the way the increase was handled. The vote was added last minute to a meeting agenda as an addendum and was passed with virtually no time for public comment.

Stan Ingold

  

Rural Alabama residents will finally be able to get broadband internet thanks to an FCC program. It’s called Connect America and its mission is to provide access to high-speed internet everywhere in the country.

     Mark Wigfield is spokesman for the FCC. He says Windstream Communications is the latest company to come on board with Connect America.

There’s no finalized state budget. But Alabama lawmakers did pass one bill that lets members of certain agencies and boards to phone in their votes. The measure requires a majority of the panel's quorum would have to be physically present in the meeting room.The Alabama Public Service Commission, standing legislative committees, and the Alabama Ethics Commission would not be allowed to meet electronically. The bill now goes to Gov. Robert Bentley for his signature.

There’s no finalized state budget. But Alabama lawmakers did pass one bill that lets members of certain agencies and boards to phone in their votes. The measure requires a majority of the panel's quorum would have to be physically present in the meeting room.The Alabama Public Service Commission, standing legislative committees, and the Alabama Ethics Commission would not be allowed to meet electronically. The bill now goes to Gov. Robert Bentley for his signature.

Alabama lawmakers ended a special session without a budget.

Lawmakers are leaving Montgomery after the special session hit a 30-day time limit without agreeing on taxes or cuts to address a budget shortfall.

The House voted down Senate-passed budget cuts yesterday by an overwhelming 92-2 vote.

Gov. Robert Bentley is expected to call lawmakers back for a second special session.

The Alabama Senate narrowly passed a budget that slashes millions of dollars from Medicaid, mental health, law enforcement and nearly all other state agencies.

Senators voted 19-15 for the cut-filled budget yesterday after lawmakers failed to agree on how to fix a $200 million budget shortfall during the special session. The new budget is identical to the one passed at the end of the regular session and then vetoed by Alabama Governor Robert Bentley.

Senate narrowly passes budget, Alabama Football media day

Aug 10, 2015

The Alabama Senate has narrowly approved a budget that slashes millions of dollars from Medicaid, mental health, law enforcement and other state agencies.

Senators voted 19-15 for the cut-filled budget today after lawmakers could not agree during a special session on how to fill a budget hole. The House of Representatives will decide whether to go along with the spending plan.

Legislators rejected Gov. Robert Bentley's call for $302 million in taxes. The Senate-passed plan cuts nearly $200 million from state agencies.

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley says he will not back down as he battles with members of his own party over tax increases.

The governor says the cuts currently proposed to state services will cause a tremendous amount of pain to the citizens if lawmakers fail to plug a revenue hole.

The Alabama Senate will vote later today on a budget that slashes $200 million from Alabama’s state agency funding. Governor Bentley calls that budget unworkable and unacceptable. Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh says Republican senators remain largely opposed to any tax increases.

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