Members of a city board of education in Alabama are looking to dismiss a lawsuit against them that centers on their vote not to retain the school system’s superintendent.

The four members of the Gadsden City School system had voted against renewing Superintendent Ed Miller’s contract. The Gadsden Times reports they voted over the three other members of the board, who claim they weren’t consulted about the vote.

Descendants of African-American men in the infamous Tuskegee Syphilis study want what’s left in a $9 million dollar legal settlement. The group sent a letter to U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson asking him to withhold a decision on the money until they have time to hire a lawyer and file documents in the long-running, class-action lawsuit over the study. Supporters of the Tuskegee descendants say the money could help fund college scholarships the group provides, and members would like to develop a memorial garden dedicated to the men.

bettyx1138 [Flickr]

Allowing a pet to jump up on countertops is not a good idea for several reasons, but one of the most dangerous is allowing them access to  a gas cooktop.  One misstep could bump a knob that turns on the cooking flame, which has the possibility of starting a fire with no human present to correct the situation.  Covering or removing the knobs when pets are home alone can help to prevent a disaster.

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The city of Huntsville is rolling out the red carpet for what it hopes will be a new employer. The city council unanimously approved a two-part deal to bring the Blue Origin rocket engine factory to town. If built, the facility could bring with it four hundred high paying positions. Amazon founder Jeff Bezos owns Blue Origin. His two hundred million dollar factory could reduce America’s reliance on Russian rocket engines to blast cargo into space. Rocket builder United Launch Alliance would have to ink a deal with Blue Origin for the Huntsville factory to become a reality.

Tuition will be increasing slightly for students in Alabama’s two-year college system.

The Tuscaloosa News reports trustees have approved a 1.4 percent tuition increase for Alabama’s Community College System. The price of each credit hour will be going up $2 to $119 for students who are Alabama residents. Nonresidents will be paying $234 per credit hour, beginning this fall.

Trustee chairman Al Thompson calls the rate hike “modest”. He says it’s part of an annual adjustment that was first established by the Alabama Board of Education, which used to operate the system.

President Donald Trump is nominating two attorneys to become federal judges for north Alabama.

 The White House says Annemarie Carney Axon and Liles C. Burke will both will U.S. District Court judgeships if confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

Two new people are joining Alabama Governor Kay Ivey’s cabinet.

Governor Ivey’s office says Jim Purcell has just been named the acting secretary of Information Technology, and Todd Cotton is now the acting commissioner of the Alabama Department of Senior Services.

Purcell has worked as the chief operations officer of the Alabama Office of Information Technology since last December. That position involves overseeing all the shared services offered by the agency across the state.

An Alabama state court says a 12-year-old girl who was impregnated by a relative will be allowed to get an abortion without a parent’s consent.

Yesterday, the Alabama Civil Court of Appeals ruled in favor of a girl seeking a waiver from a state law that requires minors receive parental consent before having an abortion. The decision says a relative currently charged with statutory rape got the girl pregnant, and the girl was removed from her home after her mother reacted violently. The girl doesn’t know her father.

Christopher Wray, President Trump's nominee for FBI Director, faces the Senate Judiciary Committee today for his confirmation hearing. Wray would replace James Comey, whom Trump fired in May. Click the headline for the live stream of the hearing. 

The Alabama Board of Education recently terminated its contract with ACT Aspire for standardized testing, and it looks like the board has found a replacement.

Al.com reports that at a board meeting last night, Alabama Superintendent Michael Sentance announced school districts throughout the state can expect to use Scantron assessments for standardized testing in third through eighth grade beginning in the upcoming school year.

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